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Citations for "Employer learning and statistical discrimination"

by Joseph G. Altonji & Charles R. Pierret

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  1. Hansen, Karsten T. & Heckman, James J. & Mullen, K.J.Kathleen J., 2004. "The effect of schooling and ability on achievement test scores," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 39-98.
  2. Brunello, Giorgio & Comi, Simona, 2004. "Education and earnings growth: evidence from 11 European countries," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 75-83, February.
  3. Eliasson, Tove, 2013. "Decomposing immigrant wage assimilation - the role of workplaces and occupations," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2013:6, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  4. Anne-Marie Daune-Richard & Pierre Béret & Arnaud Dupray & Christine Fournier & Stéphanie Moullet, 2002. "Les disparités de carrières des hommes et des femmes : accès à l'emploi, mobilités et salaires," Working Papers halshs-00005795, HAL.
  5. Donal O'Neill & Olive Sweetman & Dirk van de Gaer, 2000. "Estimating Counterfactual Densities: An application to Black-White Wage Differentials in the U.S," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n1040600, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
  6. David Neumark & Harry Holzer, 2000. "Assessing Affirmative Action," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(3), pages 483-568, September.
  7. Pinkston, Joshua C., 2003. "Screening discrimination and the determinants of wages," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(6), pages 643-658, December.
  8. Luojia Hu & Christopher Taber, 2005. "Layoffs, Lemons, Race, and Gender," NBER Working Papers 11481, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Havet, Nathalie, 2004. "Écarts salariaux et disparités professionnelles entre sexes : développements théoriques et validité empirique," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 80(1), pages 5-39, Mars.
  10. David Neumark, 1998. "Labor Market Information and Wage Differentials by Race and Sex," NBER Working Papers 6573, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Kate Antonovics & Brian G. Knight, 2009. "A New Look at Racial Profiling: Evidence from the Boston Police Department," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(1), pages 163-177, February.
  12. Barr & Oduro, Abena, 2000. "Ethnicity and wage determination in Ghana," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2506, The World Bank.
  13. Eric Strobl, 2004. "Do employers use education as a signal for ability in developing countries? Evidence from Ghana," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(4), pages 259-261.
  14. Carlsson, Magnus & Fumarco, Luca & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2013. "Artifactual evidence of discrimination in correspondence studies? A replication of the Neumark method," POLIS Working Papers 172, Institute of Public Policy and Public Choice - POLIS.
  15. Balsa, Ana I. & McGuire, Thomas G., 2001. "Statistical discrimination in health care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 881-907, November.
  16. Tricia Lynn Gladden & Christopher R. Taber, 1999. "Wage Progression Among Less Skilled Workers," JCPR Working Papers 72, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  17. Peter Thompson & Mihaela Pintea, 2005. "Technological Complexity, R&D and Education: Some Pleasant Arithmetic," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 185, Society for Computational Economics.
  18. repec:eee:labchp:v:3:y:1999:i:pc:p:3143-3259 is not listed on IDEAS
  19. Mihaela Iulia Pintea & Peter Thompson, 2007. "Technological Complexity and Economic Growth," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(2), pages 276-293, April.
This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.