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The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Student Absence: Evidence from Sweden

Author

Listed:
  • Cattan, Sarah

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies, London)

  • Kamhöfer, Daniel A.

    () (University of Paderborn)

  • Karlsson, Martin

    () (University of Duisburg-Essen)

  • Nilsson, Therese

    () (Lund University)

Abstract

Instructional time is seen as an important determinant of school performance, but little is known about the effects of student absence. Combining historical records and administrative data for Swedish individuals born in the 1930s, we examine the impacts of absence in elementary school on short-term academic performance and long-term socio-economic outcomes. Our siblings and individual fixed effects estimates suggest absence has a moderate adverse effect on academic performance. The detrimental effect fades out over time. While absence negatively correlates with final education, income and longevity, we only find robust evidence that it lowers the probability of employment at age 25–30.

Suggested Citation

  • Cattan, Sarah & Kamhöfer, Daniel A. & Karlsson, Martin & Nilsson, Therese, 2017. "The Short- and Long-Term Effects of Student Absence: Evidence from Sweden," IZA Discussion Papers 10995, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10995
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    Cited by:

    1. Alex-Petersen, Jesper & Lundborg, Petter & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2017. "Long-Term Effects of Childhood Nutrition: Evidence from a School Lunch Reform," IZA Discussion Papers 11234, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Bhalotra, Sonia R. & Karlsson, Martin & Nilsson, Therese & Schwarz, Nina, 2016. "Infant Health, Cognitive Performance and Earnings: Evidence from Inception of the Welfare State in Sweden," IZA Discussion Papers 10339, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    absence in school; educational performance; long-term effects; register data;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education

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