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The Impact of Schooling Intensity on Student Learning: Evidence from a Quasi-Experiment

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  • Andrietti, Vincenzo

    (University of Chieti-Pescara)

  • Su, Xuejuan

    (University of Alberta, Department of Economics)

Abstract

This paper uses data from a quasi-natural policy experiment in Germany to examine the impact of schooling intensity on student achievement. The policy experiment, which we call the G8 reform, compresses secondary schooling for academic-track students from nine to eight years. At the same time, it keeps the amount of academic content required for graduation fixed, resulting in an increase in schooling intensity per school year. Using German extension of the PISA data, we find that the increased schooling intensity associated with the reform improves student test scores on average, but there is significant heterogeneity across students depending on their characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrietti, Vincenzo & Su, Xuejuan, 2017. "The Impact of Schooling Intensity on Student Learning: Evidence from a Quasi-Experiment," Working Papers 2017-4, University of Alberta, Department of Economics, revised 30 Apr 2018.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:albaec:2017_004
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    3. Benjamin W. Arold & Ludger Woessmann & Larissa Zierow, 2022. "Can Schools Change Religious Attitudes? Evidence from German State Reforms of Compulsory Religious Education," CESifo Working Paper Series 9504, CESifo.
    4. Camarero Garcia, Sebastian, 2022. "Inequality of Educational Opportunities and the Role of Learning Intensity," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    schooling intensity; instruction hours; student achievement; heterogeneity;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D04 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Policy: Formulation; Implementation; Evaluation
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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