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The Long-Term Effects of Long Terms. Compulsory Schooling Reforms in Sweden

Author

Listed:
  • Karlsson, Martin
  • Schwarz, Nina
  • Fischer, Martin
  • Nilsson, Therese

Abstract

We evaluate the impact on earnings, pensions, and further labor market outcomes of two parallel educational reforms increasing instructional time in Swedish primary school. The reforms extended the annual term length and compulsory schooling by comparable amounts. We find striking differences in the effects of the two reforms: at 5%, the returns to the term length extension were at least half as high as OLS returns to education and benefited broad ranges of the population. The compulsory schooling extension had small (2%) albeit significant effects, which were possibly driven by an increase in post-compulsory schooling. Both reforms led to increased sorting into occupations with heavy reliance on basic skills.

Suggested Citation

  • Karlsson, Martin & Schwarz, Nina & Fischer, Martin & Nilsson, Therese, 2018. "The Long-Term Effects of Long Terms. Compulsory Schooling Reforms in Sweden," Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181576, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc18:181576
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Magomedov, Rustam (Магомедов, Рустам) & Ponomareva, Ekaterina (Пономарева, Екатерина), 2018. "Industrial Policy of Russia at a New Stage of Development: Limiting Economic Growth and Overcoming Them
      [Промышленная Политика России На Новом Этапе Развития: Ограничения Экономического Роста И Их
      ," Working Papers 031803, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Educational reforms; Compulsory schooling; Term length; Returns to Education;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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