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Intergenerational Transmission of Education and Mediating Channels: Evidence from a Compulsory Schooling Reform in Germany

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  • Marc Piopiunik

Abstract

In this paper, I estimate the causal effect that an additional year of schooling for parents has on their children's education, by exploiting a compulsory schooling reform that was implemented in all West German states between 1946 and 1969. Although previous research indicates that the reform had no effect on earnings, I find that an additional year of schooling for women strongly affects the education of their sons. There is no effect for the other parent–child gender pairs. I investigate numerous channels that might mediate the positive effect of the education of mothers. Most importantly, I find that individuals with more schooling value their children's educational success as more important.

Suggested Citation

  • Marc Piopiunik, 2014. "Intergenerational Transmission of Education and Mediating Channels: Evidence from a Compulsory Schooling Reform in Germany," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 116(3), pages 878-907, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:116:y:2014:i:3:p:878-907
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/sjoe.12063
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    Cited by:

    1. Alessandro Balestrino & Lisa Grazzini & Annalisa Luporini, 2017. "A normative justification of compulsory education," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 537-567, April.
    2. repec:kap:jecinq:v:16:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10888-017-9360-z is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Luna Bellani & Michela Bia, 2016. "Intergenerational poverty transmission in Europe: The role of education," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2016-02, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    4. Meng, Xin & Zhao, Guochang, 2016. "The Long Shadow of the Chinese Cultural Revolution: The Intergenerational Transmission of Education," IZA Discussion Papers 10460, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Fischer, Martin & Karlsson, Martin & Nilsson, Therese & Schwarz, Nina, 2017. "The long-term effects of long terms: Compulsory schooling reforms in Sweden," Ruhr Economic Papers 733, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    6. Fischer, Martin & Karlsson, Martin & Nilsson, Therese & Schwarz, Nina, 2016. "The Sooner the Better? Compulsory Schooling Reforms in Sweden," IZA Discussion Papers 10430, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Mathias Huebener, 2017. "Intergenerational Effects of Education on Risky Health Behaviours and Long-Term Health," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1709, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    8. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:62:y:2018:i:c:p:82-90 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Marisa Hidalgo-Hidalgo & Iñigo Iturbe-Ormaetxe, 2018. "Long-run effects of public expenditure on poverty," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 16(1), pages 1-22, March.
    10. Bellani, Luna & Bia, Michela, 2017. "The Long-Run Impact of Childhood Poverty and the Mediating Role of Education," IZA Discussion Papers 10677, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Jorge M. Agüero & Maithili Ramachandran, 2016. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Schooling among the Education-Rationed," Working papers 2016-25, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    12. Kramer, Anica & Tamm, Marcus, 2016. "Does Learning Beget Learning Throughout Adulthood? Evidence from Employees' Training Participation," IZA Discussion Papers 9959, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Amin, Vikesh & Lundborg, Petter & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2015. "The intergenerational transmission of schooling: Are mothers really less important than fathers?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 100-117.
    14. Pedro Albarran Pérez & Marisa Hidalgo Hidalgo & Iñigo Iturbe-Ormaetxe Kortajarene, 2017. "Schooling and adult health: Can education overcome bad early-life conditions?," Working Papers. Serie AD 2017-09, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).

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