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The Effect of Education on Fertility: Evidence from a Compulsory Schooling Reform

  • Cygan-Rehm, Kamila
  • Mäder, Miriam
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    This study analyzes the effect of education on the number of children, childlessness, and the timing of the first birth. We use exogenous variation from a mandatory reform to compulsory schooling in West Germany to deal with the endogeneity of schooling. In contrast to studies for other developed countries, we find a significant negative effect of education on completed fertility. We attribute this finding to the particularly high opportunity costs of child-rearing in Germany.

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    File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/62037/1/VfS_2012_pid_145.pdf
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    Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association in its series Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century with number 62037.

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    Date of creation: 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc12:62037
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.socialpolitik.org/
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