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Women’s Education, Fertility and Children’ Health during a Gender Equalization Process: Evidence from a Child Labor Reform in Spain

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Listed:
  • Cristina Belles-Obrero
  • Antonio Cabrales
  • Sergi Jiménez-Martín
  • Judit Vall-Castello

Abstract

We study the effect of women’s education on fertility and children’s health during a period ofgender equalization and women’s greater access to economic opportunities.

Suggested Citation

  • Cristina Belles-Obrero & Antonio Cabrales & Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Judit Vall-Castello, 2021. "Women’s Education, Fertility and Children’ Health during a Gender Equalization Process: Evidence from a Child Labor Reform in Spain," Working Papers 2021-04, FEDEA.
  • Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaddt:2021-04
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. SandraE. Black & PaulJ. Devereux & KjellG. Salvanes, 2008. "Staying in the Classroom and out of the maternity ward? The effect of compulsory schooling laws on teenage births," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(530), pages 1025-1054, July.
    2. Janet Currie & Enrico Moretti, 2003. "Mother's Education and the Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital: Evidence from College Openings," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1495-1532.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J81 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Working Conditions

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