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Education, HIV, and Early Fertility: Experimental Evidence from Kenya

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  • Duflo, Esther
  • Dupas, Pascaline
  • Kremer, Michael

Abstract

A seven-year randomized evaluation suggests education subsidies reduce adolescent girls’ dropout, pregnancy, and marriage but not sexually transmitted infection (STI). The government’s HIV curriculum, which stresses abstinence until marriage, does not reduce pregnancy or STI. Both programs combined reduce STI more, but cut dropout and pregnancy less, than education subsidies alone. These results are inconsistent with a model of schooling and sexual behavior in which both pregnancy and STI are determined by one factor (unprotected sex), but consistent with a two-factor model in which choices between committed and casual relationships also affect these outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Duflo, Esther & Dupas, Pascaline & Kremer, Michael, 2015. "Education, HIV, and Early Fertility: Experimental Evidence from Kenya," CEPR Discussion Papers 10338, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10338
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; fertility; HIV; Kenya; pregnancy;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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