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An Equilibrium Model of the African HIV/AIDS Epidemic

  • Philipp Kircher

    (LSE and University of Edinburgh)

  • Michele Tertilt

    (University of Mannheim)

  • Cezar Santos

    (University of Mannheim)

  • Jeremy Greenwood

    (University of Pennsylvania)

Eleven percent of the Malawian population is HIV infected. Eighteen percent of sexual encounters are casual. A condom is used one quarter of the time. A choice-theoretic general equilibrium search model is constructed to analyze the Malawian epidemic. In the developed framework, people select between different sexual practices while knowing the inherent risk. The analysis suggests that the efficacy of public policy depends upon the induced behavioral changes and general equilibrium effects that are typically absent in epidemiological studies and small-scale field experiments. For some interventions (some forms of promoting condoms or marriage), the quantitative exercise suggests that these effects may increase HIV prevalence, while for others (such as male circumcision or increased incomes) they strengthen the effectiveness of the intervention. The underlying channels giving rise to these effects are discussed in detail.

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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2013 Meeting Papers with number 195.

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Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:red:sed013:195
Contact details of provider: Postal: Society for Economic Dynamics Marina Azzimonti Department of Economics Stonybrook University 10 Nicolls Road Stonybrook NY 11790 USA
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