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Education, HIV Status, and Risky Sexual Behavior: How Much Does the Stage of the HIV Epidemic Matter?

Author

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  • Daniela Iorio
  • Raül Santaeulàlia-Llopis

Abstract

We study the relationship between education and HIV status using nationally representative data from 39 Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) in Sub-Saharan Africa. First, we construct an innovative algorithm that systematically defines aggregate stages of the HIV epidemic in a comparable manner across time and across space. Second, we exploit the variation in the aggregate HIV stages in the DHS data, and find that the education gradient in HIV shows a U-shaped (positive-zero-positive) pattern over the course of the epidemic. Further, educational disparities in the number of extramarital partners are largely consistent with the evolution of the education gradient in HIV.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniela Iorio & Raül Santaeulàlia-Llopis, 2011. "Education, HIV Status, and Risky Sexual Behavior: How Much Does the Stage of the HIV Epidemic Matter?," Working Papers 624, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bge:wpaper:624
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    Cited by:

    1. David M. Cutler & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2012. "Education and Health: Insights from International Comparisons," NBER Working Papers 17738, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Jeremy Greenwood & Philipp Kircher & Cezar Santos & Michèle Tertilt, 2019. "An Equilibrium Model of the African HIV/AIDS Epidemic," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 87(4), pages 1081-1113, July.
    3. Yao, Yao, 2016. "Fertility and HIV risk in Africa," Working Paper Series 5342, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    4. Marinescu, Ioana, 2014. "HIV, wages, and the skill premium," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 181-197.
    5. Esther Duflo & Pascaline Dupas & Michael Kremer, 2015. "Education, HIV, and Early Fertility: Experimental Evidence from Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(9), pages 2757-2797, September.
    6. Rody Manuelli & Raul Santaeulalia-Llopis, 2012. "A Quantitative Theory of HIV Diffusion," 2012 Meeting Papers 1101, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Leandro De Magalhães & Raül Santaeulàlia-Llopis, 2015. "The Consumption, Income, and Wealth of the Poorest: Cross-Sectional Facts of Rural and Urban Sub-Saharan Africa for Macroeconomists," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 15/655, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    8. Barakat, Bilal, 2016. "Improving Adult Literacy Without Improving The Literacy of Adults? A Cross-National Cohort Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 242-257.
    9. Hadley, Craig & Maxfield, Amanda & Hruschka, Daniel, 2019. "Different forms of household wealth are associated with opposing risks for HIV infection in East Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 344-351.
    10. Francesco Strobbe & Claudia Olivetti & Mireille Jacobson, 2013. "Breaking the Net: Family Structure and Street-Connected Children in Zambia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(5), pages 670-688, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    HIV; Demographics;

    JEL classification:

    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development

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