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Economic Status and Health in Childhood: The Origins of the Gradient

Author

Listed:
  • Anne Case
  • Darren Lubotsky
  • Christina Paxson

Abstract

The well-known positive association between health and income in adulthood has antecedents in childhood. Not only is children's health positively related to household income, but the relationship between household income and children's health becomes more pronounced as children age. Part of the relationship can be explained by the arrival and impact of chronic conditions. Children from lowerincome households with chronic conditions have worse health than do those from higher-income households. The adverse health effects of lower income accumulate over children's lives. Part of the intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic status may work through the impact of parents' income on children's health.

Suggested Citation

  • Anne Case & Darren Lubotsky & Christina Paxson, 2002. "Economic Status and Health in Childhood: The Origins of the Gradient," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1308-1334, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:92:y:2002:i:5:p:1308-1334
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/000282802762024520
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution

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    1. Economic Status and Health in Childhood: The Origins of the Gradient (AER 2002) in ReplicationWiki

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