IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/uwp/jhriss/v30y1995i1p135-162.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Medical Care for Children: Public Insurance, Private Insurance, and Racial Differences in Utilization

Author

Listed:
  • Janet Currie
  • Duncan Thomas

Abstract

Data from two waves of the Child-Mother module of the National Longitudinal Surveys are used to examine the medical care received by children. We compare those covered by Medicaid, by private health insurance and those with no insurance coverage at all. We find there are substantial differences in the impact of public and private health insurance and these effects also differ between blacks and whites. White children on Medicaid tend to have more doctor checkups than any other children and white children on Medicaid or a private insurance plan have a higher number of doctor visits for illness. In contrast, for black children, neither Medicaid nor private insurance coverage is associated with any advantage in terms of the number of doctor visits for illness. Furthermore, black children with private coverage are no more likely than those with no coverage to have doctor checkups; black Medicaid children are more likely than either group to have checkups although the gap is not precisely estimated. We exploit the longitudinal dimension of the data in order to take account of potential selection and thus include child specific fixed effects in the models. The results are robust to the inclusion of these controls for unobserved heterogeneity. They suggest that private and public health insurance mean different things to different children, and that national insurance coverage will not equalize utilization of care.

Suggested Citation

  • Janet Currie & Duncan Thomas, 1995. "Medical Care for Children: Public Insurance, Private Insurance, and Racial Differences in Utilization," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(1), pages 135-162.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:30:y:1995:i:1:p:135-162
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/146194
    Download Restriction: A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Joseph J. Doyle Jr., 2005. "Health Insurance, Treatment and Outcomes: Using Auto Accidents as Health Shocks," NBER Working Papers 11099, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Diane Alexander & Janet Currie, 2016. "Are Publicly Insured Children Less Likely to be Admitted to Hospital than the Privately Insured (and Does it Matter)?," NBER Working Papers 22542, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Jonathan Gruber, 2003. "Medicaid," NBER Chapters,in: Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, pages 15-78 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Genevieve Kenney & Christopher Trenholm & Lisa Dubay & Myoung Kim & Lorenzo Moreno & Jamie Rubenstein & Anna Sommers & Stephen Zuckerman & William Black & Fredric Blavin & Grace Ko, "undated". "The Experiences of SCHIP Enrollees and Disenrollees in 10 States: Findings from the Congressionally Mandated SCHIP Evaluation," Mathematica Policy Research Reports cb55b5872601468486fbd7b43, Mathematica Policy Research.
    5. Currie, Janet & Fahr, John, 2005. "Medicaid managed care: effects on children's Medicaid coverage and utilization," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 85-108, January.
    6. Currie, Janet & Grogger, Jeffrey, 2002. "Medicaid expansions and welfare contractions: offsetting effects on prenatal care and infant health?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 313-335, March.
    7. Cathy J. Bradley & David Neumark & Lisa M. Shickle & Nicholas Farrell, 2008. "Differences in Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment:Experiences of Insured and Uninsured Patients in a Safety Net Setting," NBER Working Papers 13875, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Robert Kaestner & Theodore Joyce & Andrew Racine, 1999. "Does Publicly Provided Health Insurance Improve the Health of Low-Income Children in the United States," NBER Working Papers 6887, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Janet Currie & Jonathan Gruber, 1997. "The Technology of Birth: Health Insurance, Medical Interventions, and Infant Health," NBER Working Papers 5985, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Janet Currie, 2000. "Do Children of Immigrants Make Differential Use of Public Health Insurance?," NBER Chapters,in: Issues in the Economics of Immigration, pages 271-308 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Busch, Susan H. & Duchovny, Noelia, 2005. "Family coverage expansions: Impact on insurance coverage and health care utilization of parents," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 876-890, September.
    12. Janet Currie, 1998. "The Effect of Welfare on Child Outcomes: What We Know and What We Need to Know," JCPR Working Papers 26, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    13. Pylypchuk, Yuriy & Selden, Thomas M., 2008. "A discrete choice decomposition analysis of racial and ethnic differences in children's health insurance coverage," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 1109-1128, July.
    14. Anne Case & Darren Lubotsky & Christina Paxson, 2002. "Economic Status and Health in Childhood: The Origins of the Gradient," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1308-1334, December.
    15. Thomas Buchmueller & John C. Ham & Lara D. Shore-Sheppard, 2015. "The Medicaid Program," NBER Chapters,in: Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, volume 1, pages 21-136 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Carol Rapaport & Christopher A. Trenholm, 2000. "What do we really know about trends in outpatient medical expenditures for children, 1977-1987?," Staff Reports 97, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    17. Janet Currie & Patricia Reagan, 1998. "Distance to Hospitals and Children's Access to Care: Is Being Closer Better, and for Whom?," NBER Working Papers 6836, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. James Kirby & Toshiko Kaneda, 2010. "Unhealthy and uninsured: Exploring racial differences in health and health insurance coverage using a life table approach," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 47(4), pages 1035-1051, November.
    19. Xiaoyong Zheng & David M. Zimmer, 2009. "Racial Differences In Health-Care Utilization: Analysis By Intensity Of Demand," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 27(4), pages 475-490, October.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:30:y:1995:i:1:p:135-162. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://jhr.uwpress.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.