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Health Insurance, Treatment and Outcomes: Using Auto Accidents as Health Shocks

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  • Joseph J. Doyle Jr.

Abstract

Previous studies find that the uninsured receive less health care than the insured, yet differences in health outcomes have rarely been studied. In addition, selection bias may partly explain the difference in care received. This paper focuses on an unexpected health shock -- severe automobile accidents where victims have little choice but to visit a hospital. Another innovation is the use of a comparison group that is similar to the uninsured: those who have private health insurance but do not have automobile insurance. The medically uninsured are found to receive twenty percent less care and have a substantially higher mortality rate.

Suggested Citation

  • Joseph J. Doyle Jr., 2005. "Health Insurance, Treatment and Outcomes: Using Auto Accidents as Health Shocks," NBER Working Papers 11099, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11099
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w11099.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bruno Jullien & Bernard Salanié & François Salanié, 1999. "Should More Risk-Averse Agents Exert More Effort?," The Geneva Risk and Insurance Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics (The Geneva Association), vol. 24(1), pages 19-28, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wagstaff, Adam & Lindelow, Magnus, 2008. "Can insurance increase financial risk?: The curious case of health insurance in China," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 990-1005, July.
    2. Amy Finkelstein & Sarah Taubman & Bill Wright & Mira Bernstein & Jonathan Gruber & Joseph P. Newhouse & Heidi Allen & Katherine Baicker, 2012. "The Oregon Health Insurance Experiment: Evidence from the First Year," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(3), pages 1057-1106.
    3. Michael Anderson & Carlos Dobkin & Tal Gross, 2012. "The Effect of Health Insurance Coverage on the Use of Medical Services," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 4(1), pages 1-27, February.
    4. John Karl Scholz & Ananth Seshadri, 2016. "The Interaction between Consumption and Health in Retirement," Working Papers wp344, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    5. Dionne, Georges & Michaud, Pierre-Carl & Pinquet, Jean, 2013. "A review of recent theoretical and empirical analyses of asymmetric information in road safety and automobile insurance," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 85-97.
    6. Robert Kaestner, 2013. "The Grossman model after 40 years: a reply to Peter Zweifel," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 14(2), pages 357-360, April.
    7. repec:aea:aejpol:v:9:y:2017:i:2:p:28-56 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Justin R. Pierce & Peter K. Schott, 2016. "Trade Liberalization and Mortality: Evidence from U.S. Counties," NBER Working Papers 22849, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. David Card & Carlos Dobkin & Nicole Maestas, 2007. "The Impact of Health Insurance Status on Treatment Intensity and Health Outcomes," Working Papers WR-505, RAND Corporation.
    10. Benedic N. Ippolito, 2016. "Financial incentives, hospital care, and health outcomes: Evidence from fair pricing laws," AEI Economics Working Papers 863745, American Enterprise Institute.
    11. Johar, Meliyanni & Jones, Glenn & Keane, Micheal P. & Savage, Elizabeth & Stavrunova, Olena, 2013. "Discrimination in a universal health system: Explaining socioeconomic waiting time gaps," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 181-194.
    12. David Card & Carlos Dobkin & Nicole Maestas, 2007. "The Impact of Health Insurance Status on Treatment Intensity and Health Outcomes," Working Papers 505, RAND Corporation.
    13. Meliyanni Johar & Glenn Jones & Elizabeth Savage, 2014. "What Explains The Quality And Price Of Gp Services? An Investigation Using Linked Survey And Administrative Data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(9), pages 1115-1133, September.
    14. Georges Dionne & Jean Pinquet & Mathieu Maurice & Charles Vanasse, 2011. "Incentive Mechanisms for Safe Driving: A Comparative Analysis with Dynamic Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(1), pages 218-227, February.
    15. Johar, Meliyanni & Jones, Glenn & Keane, Micheal P. & Savage, Elizabeth & Stavrunova, Olena, 2013. "Discrimination in a universal health system: Explaining socioeconomic waiting time gaps," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 181-194.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets

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