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Health Insurance, Treatment and Outcomes: Using Auto Accidents as Health Shocks

  • Joseph J. Doyle Jr.
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    Previous studies find that the uninsured receive less health care than the insured, yet differences in health outcomes have rarely been studied. In addition, selection bias may partly explain the difference in care received. This paper focuses on an unexpected health shock -- severe automobile accidents where victims have little choice but to visit a hospital. Another innovation is the use of a comparison group that is similar to the uninsured: those who have private health insurance but do not have automobile insurance. The medically uninsured are found to receive twenty percent less care and have a substantially higher mortality rate.

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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w11099.pdf
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    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 11099.

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    Date of creation: Feb 2005
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    Publication status: published as Doyle Jr., Joseph J. "Health Insurance, Treatment, and Outcomes: Using Auto Accidents as Health Shocks." Review of Economics and Statistics 87, 2 (May 2005): 256-270.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:11099
    Note: EFG HE
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    7. Frank A. Sloan & Gabriel A. Picone & Donald H. Taylor, Jr. & Shin-Yi Chou, 1999. "Does Where You Are Admitted Make a Difference? An Analysis of Medicare Data," NBER Working Papers 6896, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Currie, J. & Thomas, D., 1995. "Medical Care for Children, Public Insurance, Private Insurance, and Racial Differences in Utilization," Papers 95-08, RAND - Reprint Series.
    9. Mark G. Duggan, 2000. "Hospital Ownership And Public Medical Spending," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1343-1373, November.
    10. Long, Stephen H. & Marquis, M. Susan & Rodgers, Jack, 1998. "Do people shift their use of health services over time to take advantage of insurance?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 105-115, January.
    11. Edward C. Norton & Douglas O. Staiger, 1994. "How Hospital Ownership Affects Access to Care for the Uninsured," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 25(1), pages 171-185, Spring.
    12. Dionne, Georges & St-Michel, Pierre, 1991. "Workers' Compensation and Moral Hazard," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(2), pages 236-44, May.
    13. Heckman, James J. & Lalonde, Robert J. & Smith, Jeffrey A., 1999. "The economics and econometrics of active labor market programs," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 31, pages 1865-2097 Elsevier.
    14. Fortin, Bernard & Lanoie, Paul, 1992. "Substitution between unemployment insurance and workers' compensation : An analysis applied to the risk of workplace accidents," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 287-312, December.
    15. Manning, Willard G., 1998. "The logged dependent variable, heteroscedasticity, and the retransformation problem," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 283-295, June.
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