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Schooling, cognitive ability, and health

Author

Listed:
  • M. Christopher Auld

    (University of Calgary)

  • Nirmal Sidhu

    (University of Calgary)

Abstract

A large literature documents a strong correlation between health and educational outcomes. In this paper we investigate the role of cognitive ability in the health–education nexus. Using NLSY data, we show that cognitive ability accounts for roughly one quarter of the association between schooling and health. Both schooling and ability are strongly associated with health at low levels but less related or unrelated at high levels. Estimates treating schooling as endogenous to health suggest that most of the correlation between schooling and health is attributable to unobserved heterogeneity, except possibly at low levels of schooling for individuals with low cognitive ability. An implication is that policies which increase schooling will only increase health to the extent that they increase the education of poorly-educated individuals; subsidies to college education, for example, are unlikely to increase population health.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Christopher Auld & Nirmal Sidhu, 2004. "Schooling, cognitive ability, and health," HEW 0406001, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwphe:0406001
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; health; intelligence; correlated random coefficient models;

    JEL classification:

    • I - Health, Education, and Welfare

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