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Health, wealth and happiness: why pursue a higher education?

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  • Hartog, Joop
  • Oosterbeek, Hessel

Abstract

We explore the effect of schooling on health, wealth and happiness for a cohort of Dutch individuals born around 1940. We also use observations on childhood IQ and family background. The most fortunate group is the group with a non-vocational intermediate level education: they score highest on health, wealth and happiness. We find that IQ affects health, but not wealth or happiness. Family background level increases wealth, but neither health nor happiness. With a father who worked independently, health, wealth and happiness are higher.Women are a miracle: compared to men, they are less wealthy, equally healthy but they are definitely happier.
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  • Hartog, Joop & Oosterbeek, Hessel, 1998. "Health, wealth and happiness: why pursue a higher education?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 245-256, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:17:y:1998:i:3:p:245-256
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