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Market Work, Wages, and Men's Health

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  • Haveman, Robert
  • Wolfe, Barbara
  • Kreider, Brent
  • Stone, Mark

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate the complex interrelations among work-time, wages, and health identified in the Grossman model of the demand for health. Hansen's generalized method of moments techniques are employed to estimate a 3-equation simultaneous model designed to capture the time dependent character of these interrelationships. We then estimate simpler models with more restrictive assumptions commonly found in the literature and find substantial differences between these estimates and those from our simultaneous model. For example, the positive relationship between work-time and health found in other studies disappears when the relevant simultaneities are taken into account.

Suggested Citation

  • Haveman, Robert & Wolfe, Barbara & Kreider, Brent & Stone, Mark, 1994. "Market Work, Wages, and Men's Health," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10233, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:10233
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hansen, Lars Peter, 1982. "Large Sample Properties of Generalized Method of Moments Estimators," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 1029-1054, July.
    2. Wagstaff, Adam, 1986. "The demand for health : Some new empirical evidence," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 195-233, September.
    3. Paul Taubman & Sherwin Rosen, 1982. "Healthiness, Education, and Marital Status," NBER Chapters, in: Economic Aspects of Health, pages 121-140, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Leigh, J. Paul, 1983. "Direct and indirect effects of education on health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 227-234, January.
    5. Bartel, Ann & Taubman, Paul, 1979. "Health and Labor Market Success: The Role of Various Diseases," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 61(1), pages 1-8, February.
    6. Chirikos, Thomas N & Nestel, Gilbert, 1985. "Further Evidence on the Economic Effects of Poor Health," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(1), pages 61-69, February.
    7. Muurinen, Jaana-Marja, 1982. "Demand for health: A generalised Grossman model," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 5-28, May.
    8. Michael Grossman, 1972. "The Demand for Health: A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number gros72-1, May.
    9. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1982. "Health and Wage: A Simultaneous Equation Model with Multiple Discrete Indicators," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 23(1), pages 199-221, February.
    10. Luft, Harold S, 1975. "The Impact of Poor Health on Earnings," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 57(1), pages 43-57, February.
    11. Kemna, Harrie J. M. I., 1987. "Working conditions and the relationship between schooling and health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 189-210, September.
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