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Educational Attainment and Health: Evidence from a Sample of Older Adults

  • Scott Adams

This paper provides evidence of an education-health relationship among older adults, even after controlling for individual and family background characteristics. It also explores to what extent this relationship represents an independent effect of education on health. An identification strategy using the quarter of birth and a set of parental and sibling characteristics as instrumental variables for education is used to purge estimates of biases resulting from error components correlated with education. The results suggest that the previously observed correlation between educational attainment and adult health has a causal component.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Education Economics.

Volume (Year): 10 (2002)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 97-109

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Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:10:y:2002:i:1:p:97-109
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  1. Victor R. Fuchs, 1980. "Time Preference and Health: An Exploratory Study," NBER Working Papers 0539, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Kenkel, Donald S, 1991. "Health Behavior, Health Knowledge, and Schooling," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(2), pages 287-305, April.
  3. John Bound & David A. Jaeger, 1996. "On the Validity of Season of Birth as an Instrument in Wage Equations: A Comment on Angrist & Krueger's "Does Compulsory School Attendance Affect Scho," NBER Working Papers 5835, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Joshua D. Angrist & Alan B. Krueger, 1990. "Does Compulsory School Attendance Affect Schooling and Earnings?," NBER Working Papers 3572, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Thomas, Duncan & Strauss, John, 1997. "Health and wages: Evidence on men and women in urban Brazil," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 159-185, March.
  6. John Strauss & Paul J. Gertler & Omar Rahman & Kristin Fox, 1993. "Gender and Life-Cycle Differentials in the Patterns and Determinants of Adult Health," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(4), pages 791-837.
  7. Smith, J-P & Kington, R, 1997. "Demographic and Economic Correlates of Health in Old Age," Papers 97-06, RAND - Reprint Series.
  8. Willis, Robert J., 1987. "Wage determinants: A survey and reinterpretation of human capital earnings functions," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 10, pages 525-602 Elsevier.
  9. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-55, March-Apr.
  10. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1997. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(3), pages 557-586, May.
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