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Learning For Life? The Effects of Schooling on Earnings and Health- Related Behavior Over the Life Cycle

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  • Lång, Elisabeth

    () (Division of Economics, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University)

  • Nystedt, Paul

    () (Jönköping University)

Abstract

We analyze how education is associated with earnings and health-related behaviors (HRBs) over the adult life cycle using a sample of 18,000 twins. The underlying motive is to improve the understanding of to what extent schooling may contribute to increased human welfare over time and age through the intermediaries of earnings and HRBs. We find that one additional year of schooling is associated with around 5-6 percent higher earnings at ages 35-75 and generally improved HRBs for both men and women. Much of the estimated relationships between schooling, earnings and HRBs can be traced back to genetic inheritance. Controlling for such inheritance, the remaining education-earnings premium is non-linear and increasing with educational level, and the education premium in HRBs is mainly concentrated to smoking habits.

Suggested Citation

  • Lång, Elisabeth & Nystedt, Paul, 2016. "Learning For Life? The Effects of Schooling on Earnings and Health- Related Behavior Over the Life Cycle," LiU Working Papers in Economics 4, Linköping University, Division of Economics, Department of Management and Engineering.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:liuewp:0004
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    File URL: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-133226
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Schooling; Education; Health-Related Behavior; Life-Cycle;

    JEL classification:

    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General

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