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Endowments and the Allocation of Schooling in the Family and in the Marriage Market: The Twins Experiment

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  • Behrman, Jere R
  • Rosenzweig, Mark R
  • Taubman, Paul

Abstract

The authors show how comparisons between the within-twin correlations of human capital outcomes across identical and nonidentical twins can be used to identify the variability in the individual-specific component of endowments and the responsiveness of schooling to individual-specific endowments in the family and in the marriage market even when schooling is measured with error. Estimates from two twins samples indicate that 27 (42) percent of the variance in log earnings (obesity) is due to variability in individual-specific endowments, allocations of schooling reinforce specific endowments, and individual-specific earnings endowments of men and their wives' schooling are negatively associated. Copyright 1994 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Behrman, Jere R & Rosenzweig, Mark R & Taubman, Paul, 1994. "Endowments and the Allocation of Schooling in the Family and in the Marriage Market: The Twins Experiment," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(6), pages 1131-1174, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:102:y:1994:i:6:p:1131-74
    DOI: 10.1086/261966
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1976. "Child Endowments and the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages 143-162, August.
    2. Robert D. Mare & William M. Mason, 1980. "Children's Reports of Parental Socioeconomic Status," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 9(2), pages 178-198, November.
    3. David Lam, 1988. "Marriage Markets and Assortative Mating with Household Public Goods: Theoretical Results and Empirical Implications," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(4), pages 462-487.
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