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Does Early Life Health Predict Schooling Within Twin Pairs?

Author

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  • Lundborg, Petter

    () (Lund University)

  • Nilsson, Anton

    () (Aarhus University)

  • Rooth, Dan-Olof

    () (Stockholm University)

Abstract

A large number of studies in labor economics estimate the returns to schooling using data on monozygotic twins, under the assumption that educational attainment is random within twin pairs. This exogeneity assumption has been commonly questioned, however, but there is to date little evidence on the topic. Using a large dataset of twins, including comprehensive information on their health status at the age of 18 and later educational attainment, we investigate whether educational attainment is related to early health status within monozygotic twin pairs. In general, we obtain no indication of this being so. As a result, we find little evidence that early health differences between twins would bias the estimates of the returns to schooling available in the literature.

Suggested Citation

  • Lundborg, Petter & Nilsson, Anton & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2011. "Does Early Life Health Predict Schooling Within Twin Pairs?," IZA Discussion Papers 5803, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5803
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    26. repec:ucn:wpaper:10197/317 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Vikesh Amin & Jere Behrman, 2014. "Do more-schooled women have fewer children and delay childbearing? Evidence from a sample of US twins," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(1), pages 1-31, January.
    2. Lundborg, Petter & Nilsson, Anton & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2014. "Adolescent health and adult labor market outcomes," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 25-40.
    3. Amin, Vikesh & Behrman, Jere R. & Spector, Tim D., 2013. "Does more schooling improve health outcomes and health related behaviors? Evidence from U.K. twins," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 134-148.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    twins; twin-fixed effects; ability bias; schooling; returns to schooling; health;

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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