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Health and Wages: Evidence on Men and Women in Urban Brazil

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  • Thomas, D.
  • Strauss, J.

Abstract

Survey data indicate that different dimensions of health affect the wages of men and women in urban Brazil. Height has a large and significant effect on wages: taller men and women earn more. Body mass index (BMI) is associated with higher wages of males, especially among the less-educated, suggesting that strenght may be rewarded with higher wages. Low levels of per capita calorie and protein intakes reduce wages of market-workers, but not the self-employed. After controlling for height, BMI, and calories, the influence of proteins is greater at higher levels, presumably reflecting the impact of higher-quality diets.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas, D. & Strauss, J., 1997. "Health and Wages: Evidence on Men and Women in Urban Brazil," Papers 97-05, RAND - Reprint Series.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:randrs:97-05
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    HUMAN CAPITAL ; HEALTH ; WAGES ; BRAZIL;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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