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In sickness and in health--Till education do us part: Education effects on hospitalization

Listed author(s):
  • Arendt, Jacob Nielsen

This study provides the first estimates of the causal impact of education on hospitalization. It improves upon existing studies on health and education by using a larger data set and more efficient estimation methods. Using a Danish school reform to identify a causal effect of education on hospitalization, we find that education has a substantial and significant effect on the probability of being hospitalized for women, whereas we only find a significant effect for men for selected life-style related diagnoses.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272-7757(07)00007-6
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 27 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 161-172

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:27:y:2008:i:2:p:161-172
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

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