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Non-pecuniary returns to higher education: The effect on smoking intensity in the UK

  • Alfonso Miranda

    ()

    (Keele University, Centre for Economic Research and School of Economic and Management Studies)

  • Massimiliano Bratti

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Business and Statistics, University of Milan)

In this paper we investigate whether higher education (HE) produces non-pecuniary returns via a reduction in the consumption of health-damaging substances. In particular, the paper focuses on studying the smoking intensity of British individuals. We use data on current smokers from the 1970 British Cohort Study and estimate endogenous switching count models for cigarette consumption. Results show that HE is endogenous with smoking. Once endogeneity is controlled for, HE is found to have a higher negative effect on smoking than in models where it is treated as exogenous.

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File URL: http://www.keele.ac.uk/depts/ec/wpapers/kerp0604.pdf
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Paper provided by Centre for Economic Research, Keele University in its series Keele Economics Research Papers with number KERP 2006/04.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kee:kerpuk:2006/04
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, University of Keele, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG - United Kingdom
Phone: +44 (0)1782 584581
Fax: +44 (0)1782 717577
Web page: http://www.keele.ac.uk/depts/ec/cer/Email:


More information through EDIRC

Order Information: Postal: Centre for Economic Research, Research Institute for Public Policy and Management, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG - United Kingdom
Web: http://www.keele.ac.uk/depts/ec/cer/pubs_kerps.htm Email:


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  19. Labeaga, Jose M., 1999. "A double-hurdle rational addiction model with heterogeneity: Estimating the demand for tobacco," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1), pages 49-72, November.
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