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Do health changes affect smoking? Evidence from British panel data

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  • Clark, Andrew
  • Etile, Fabrice

Abstract

This paper uses seven waves of British Household Panel Survey data to examine the link between health developments while smoking (both one's own and those of other smokers in the same household) and future cigarette consumption. We find those whose health worsens when smoking smoke less in the future, and are more likely to quit. This correlation is consistent with both a Grossman model of health demand (where all parameters are known) and with learning about the health consequences of smoking (where there is uncertainty). There is little effect on smoking from health developments amongst other smokers in the same household. As such, impersonal information provision may have less of an effect on smoking than the delivery of personalised health information, for example through the medical profession.
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  • Clark, Andrew & Etile, Fabrice, 2002. "Do health changes affect smoking? Evidence from British panel data," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 533-562, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:21:y:2002:i:4:p:533-562
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    Cited by:

    1. Clark, Andrew E. & Etile, Fabrice, 2006. "Don't give up on me baby: Spousal correlation in smoking behaviour," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 958-978, September.
    2. Kjellsson, Gustav, 2014. "Extending Decomposition Analysis to Account for Socioeconomic Background: Income-Related Smoking Inequality among Swedish Women," Working Papers 2014:29, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    3. Antoine Marsaudon & Lise Rochaix, 2017. "Impact of acute health shocks on cigarette consumption
      [Impact d'un choc de santé sur la consommation de cigarette]
      ," PSE Working Papers halshs-01626024, HAL.
    4. Clark, Andrew E. & Loheac, Youenn, 2007. ""It wasn't me, it was them!" Social influence in risky behavior by adolescents," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 763-784, July.
    5. Clark, Andrew E. & Etilé, Fabrice, 2011. "Happy house: Spousal weight and individual well-being," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1124-1136.
    6. Chen, Yu-Fu & Petrie, Dennis, 2012. "When to Quit Under Uncertainty? A real options approach to smoking cessation," SIRE Discussion Papers 2012-79, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    7. Decker, Simon & Schmitz, Hendrik, 2016. "Health shocks and risk aversion," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 156-170.
    8. Gabriel Picone & Frank Sloan, 2003. "Smoking Cessation and Lifestyle Changes," NBER Chapters,in: Frontiers in Health Policy Research, Volume 6, pages 115-142 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Junmin Wan, 2004. "Consumption of Cigarettes, Nicotine, and Tar under Anti-smoking Policies: Japan as a Case Study," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 04-12-Rev, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Mar 2006.
    10. Abdulbaki Bilgic & Wojciech Florkowski & Cuma Akbay, 2010. "Demand for cigarettes in Turkey: an application of count data models," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 733-765, December.
    11. Line Bretteville-Jensen, Anne & Biørn, Erik & Selmer, Randi, 2011. "Quitting behaviour of cigarette smokers. Are there direct effects of a screening program?," Memorandum 07/2011, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    12. Grignon, Michel, 2009. "An empirical investigation of heterogeneity in time preferences and smoking behaviors," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 739-751, October.
    13. Fichera, Eleonora & Banks, James & Siciliani, Luigi & Sutton, Matt, 2017. "Does Patient Health Behaviour respond to Doctor’s Effort?," Department of Economics Working Papers 58124, University of Bath, Department of Economics.
    14. Antoine Marsaudon & Lise Rochaix, 2010. "Impact of acute health shocks on cigarette consumption: A combined DiD-matching strategy to address endogeneity issues in the French Gazel panel data," PSE Working Papers halshs-01626187, HAL.
    15. Fabrice Etilé, 2006. "Who does the hat fit? Teenager heterogeneity and the effectiveness of information policies in preventing cannabis use and heavy drinking," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(7), pages 697-718.

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