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Congnitive Ability, Schooling and the Demand for Alcohol by Young Adults

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  • William Sander

Abstract

The effects of cognitive ability as measured by test scores and educational attainment on the demand for alchol by young adults are estimated. Data are used from a followup survery of seniors in high school in the United States. For men and women six years after their senior year in high school, it is shown that graduating from college and test scores have a negative effect on heavy drinking. Attention is also given to the hypothesis that unobserved time preference rather than education variables affect the demand for alchol.

Suggested Citation

  • William Sander, 1999. "Congnitive Ability, Schooling and the Demand for Alcohol by Young Adults," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 53-66.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:7:y:1999:i:1:p:53-66
    DOI: 10.1080/09645299900000004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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