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The role of education in explaining and forecasting trends in functional limitations among older Americans

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  • Vicki Freedman

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  • Linda Martin

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  • Vicki Freedman & Linda Martin, 1999. "The role of education in explaining and forecasting trends in functional limitations among older Americans," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 36(4), pages 461-473, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:36:y:1999:i:4:p:461-473
    DOI: 10.2307/2648084
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lillard, L.A. & Waite, L.J., 1993. "'Til Death Do Us Part: Marital Disruption and Mortality," Papers 93-10, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
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    Cited by:

    1. Iegor Rudnytskyi & Joël Wagner, 2019. "Drivers of Old-Age Dependence and Long-Term Care Usage in Switzerland—A Structural Equation Model Approach," Risks, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(3), pages 1-20, August.
    2. Datta Gupta Nabanita & Lau Daniel & Pozzoli Dario, 2016. "The Impact of Education and Occupation on Temporary and Permanent Work Incapacity," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(2), pages 577-617, April.
    3. Jona Schellekens & Anat Ziv, 2020. "The role of education in explaining trends in self-rated health in the United States, 1972–2018," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 42(12), pages 383-398.
    4. Holzmann, Robert & Alonso-García, Jennifer & Labit-Hardy, Heloise & Villegas, Andres M., 2017. "NDC Schemes and Heterogeneity in Longevity: Proposals for Redesign," IZA Discussion Papers 11193, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Namkee Ahn, "undated". "Assessing Self-Assessed Health Data," Working Papers 2002-24, FEDEA.
    6. Oliver Fritz & Peter Mayerhofer & Reinhard Haller & Gerhard Streicher & Florian Bachner & Herwig Ostermann, 2013. "Die regionalwirtschaftlichen Effekte der österreichischen Krankenanstalten," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 46672, December.
    7. Ryan D. Edwards & Ronald D. Lee, 2001. "The fiscal impact of population change," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 46.
    8. Freedman, Vicki A. & Martin, Linda G. & Schoeni, Robert F. & Cornman, Jennifer C., 2008. "Declines in late-life disability: The role of early- and mid-life factors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(7), pages 1588-1602, April.
    9. Leibowitz, Arleen A., 2004. "The demand for health and health concerns after 30 years," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 663-671, July.
    10. Morciano, Marcello & Hancock, Ruth M. & Pudney, Stephen E., 2015. "Birth-cohort trends in older-age functional disability and their relationship with socio-economic status: Evidence from a pooling of repeated cross-sectional population-based studies for the UK," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 136, pages 1-9.
    11. Bilal Barakat & Robin Shields, 2019. "Just Another Level? Comparing Quantitative Patterns of Global Expansion of School and Higher Education Attainment," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 56(3), pages 917-934, June.
    12. Zachary Zimmer & Linda Martin & Daniel Nagin & Bobby Jones, 2012. "Modeling Disability Trajectories and Mortality of the Oldest-Old in China," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(1), pages 291-314, February.
    13. Cleon Tsimbos, 2010. "An assessment of socio-economic inequalities in health among elderly in Greece, Italy and Spain," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 55(1), pages 5-15, February.
    14. Zajacova, Anna & Montez, Jennifer Karas, 2018. "Explaining the increasing disability prevalence among mid-life US adults, 2002 to 2016," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 211(C), pages 1-8.
    15. Irma Elo & Neil Mehta & Cheng Huang, 2011. "Disability Among Native-born and Foreign-born Blacks in the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(1), pages 241-265, February.
    16. Linda G. Martin, 2009. "Interventions to Improve Late Life," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 35(2), pages 331-340, June.
    17. Ronald Lee & Ryan Edwards, 2002. "The Fiscal Effects of Population Aging in the U.S.: Assessing the Uncertainties," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 16, pages 141-180, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Jibum Kim & Jinkook Lee, 2010. "Disability of Older Koreans Evidence on Prevalence and the Role of Education from Five Data Sets," Working Papers WR-811, RAND Corporation.

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