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When Knowledge Is Not Enough: HIV/AIDS Information and Risky Behavior In Botswana

Author

Listed:
  • Taryn Dinkelman

    (Department of Economics, University of Michigan)

  • James Levinsohn

    (University of Michigan Ford School of Public Policy and NBER)

  • Rolang Majelantle

    (Department of Population Studies University of Botswana)

Abstract

The spread of the HIV/AIDS epidemic is still fueled by ignorance in many parts of the world. Filling in knowledge gaps, particularly between men and women, is considered key to preventing future infections and to reducing female vulnerabilities to the disease. However, such knowledge is arguably only a necessary condition for targeting these objectives. In this paper, we describe the extent to which HIV/AIDS knowledge is correlated with less risky sexual behavior. We ask: even when there are no substantial knowledge gaps between men and women, do we still observe sex-specific differentials in sexual behavior that would increase vulnerability to infection? We use data from two recent household surveys in Botswana to address this question. We show that even when men and women have very similar types of knowledge, they have different probabilities of reporting safe sex. Our findings are consistent with the existence of non-informational barriers to behavioral change, some of which appear to be sex-specific. The descriptive exercise in this paper suggests that it may be overly optimistic to hope for reductions in risky behavior through the channel of HIV-information provision alone.

Suggested Citation

  • Taryn Dinkelman & James Levinsohn & Rolang Majelantle, 2006. "When Knowledge Is Not Enough: HIV/AIDS Information and Risky Behavior In Botswana," Working Papers 553, Research Seminar in International Economics, University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:mie:wpaper:553
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    File URL: http://www.fordschool.umich.edu/rsie/workingpapers/Papers551-575/r553.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cohen, Barney, 1998. "The emerging fertility transition in sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(8), pages 1431-1461, August.
    2. Nnko, Soori & Boerma, J.T.J Ties & Urassa, Mark & Mwaluko, Gabriel & Zaba, Basia, 2004. "Secretive females or swaggering males?: An assessment of the quality of sexual partnership reporting in rural Tanzania," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 299-310, July.
    3. Peter Glick & David Sahn, 2007. "Changes in HIV/AIDS knowledge and testing behavior in Africa: how much and for whom?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(2), pages 383-422, April.
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    2. Baland, Jean-Marie & Aldashev, Gani, 2012. "Awareness and AIDS: A Political Economy Perspective," CEPR Discussion Papers 8908, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Malebogo Solomon & Luis Furuya-Kanamori & Kinley Wangdi, 2021. "Spatial Analysis of HIV Infection and Associated Risk Factors in Botswana," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 18(7), pages 1-13, March.
    4. Pedro de Araujo & Margaux Miller, 2014. "Women's Health Knowledge, Sexual Empowerment, and HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(3), pages 1875-1890.
    5. Pedro de Araujo, 2008. "Socio-Economic Status, HIV/AIDS Knowledge and Stigma, and Sexual Behavior in India," CAEPR Working Papers 2008-019, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Department of Economics, Indiana University Bloomington, revised Sep 2008.
    6. Daniela Iorio & Raül Santaeulàlia-Llopis, 2011. "Education, HIV Status, and Risky Sexual Behavior: How Much Does the Stage of the HIV Epidemic Matter?," Working Papers 624, Barcelona School of Economics.
    7. Ranjan Ray & Kompal Sinha, 2011. "Interaction between HIV Awareness, Knowledge, Safe Sex Practice and HIV Incidence: Evidence from Botswana," Monash Economics Working Papers 12-11, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    8. Pedro de Araujo, 2008. "Socio-Economic Status, HIV/AIDS Knowledge and Stigma, and Sexual Behavior in India," Caepr Working Papers 2008-019_updated, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington, revised Sep 2008.

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    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General

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