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The HIV Epidemic in Four African Countries Seen through the Demographic and Health Surveys

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  • Mark Gersovitz

Abstract

The Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) for Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia provide information on how people react to HIV/AIDS: knowledge acquisition; (self-declared) strategies for avoiding HIV; age at first intercourse; monogamy; abstinence; having been tested and wanting to be tested. A subsample of respondents are marriage partners allowing the analysis of assortativeness in behaviour. When possible, DHS findings are related to the epidemiological literature. Throughout, attention is given to the internal consistency of the surveys and their consistency with epidemiological studies. Suggestions are made for the improvement of DHS-type surveys. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Gersovitz, 2005. "The HIV Epidemic in Four African Countries Seen through the Demographic and Health Surveys," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 14(2), pages 191-246, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:14:y:2005:i:2:p:191-246
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tanzi, Vito, 1986. "Fiscal Policy Responses to Exogenous Shocks in Developing Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(2), pages 88-91, May.
    2. Lane, Philip R & Tornell, Aaron, 1996. "Power, Growth, and the Voracity Effect," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 213-241, June.
    3. Psacharopoulos, George, 1994. "Returns to investment in education: A global update," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(9), pages 1325-1343, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:dau:papers:123456789/9522 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Mark Gersovitz, 2011. "Infectious Diseases: Responses to the Security Threat Without Borders," Chapters,in: Security and Development, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. repec:dau:papers:123456789/7310 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Peter J. Glick & David E. Sahn, 2008. "Are Africans Practicing Safer Sex? Evidence from Demographic and Health Surveys for Eight Countries," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 397-439.
    5. Corno, Lucia & de Walque, Damien, 2007. "The determinants of HIV infection and related sexual behaviors : evidence from Lesotho," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4421, The World Bank.
    6. Mika Ueyama & Futoshi Yamauchi, 2009. "Marriage behavior response to prime-age adult mortality: evidence from malawi," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 46(1), pages 43-63, February.
    7. Eva Deuchert, 2011. "The Virgin HIV Puzzle: Can Misreporting Account for the High Proportion of HIV Cases in Self-reported Virgins?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 20(1), pages 60-89, January.
    8. Ibrahim Kasirye, 2016. "HIV/AIDS Sero-prevalence and Socio-economic Status: Evidence from Uganda," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 28(3), pages 304-318, September.
    9. James A. Levinsohn & Taryn Dinkelman & Rolang Majelantle, 2006. "When Knowledge is not Enough: HIV/AIDS Information and Risky Behavior in Botswana," NBER Working Papers 12418, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Yamauchi, Futoshi, 2007. "Marriage, schooling, and excess mortality in prime-age adults: Evidence from South Africa," IFPRI discussion papers 691, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. Beegle, Kathleen & de Walque, Damien, 2009. "Demographic and socioeconomic patterns of HIV/AIDS prevalence in Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5076, The World Bank.
    12. de Walque, Damien, 2006. "Who gets AIDS and how ? The determinants of HIV infection and sexual behaviors in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ghana, Kenya, and Tanzania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3844, The World Bank.
    13. World Bank, 2009. "Swaziland - HIV Prevention Response and Modes of Transmission Analysis," World Bank Other Operational Studies 3046, The World Bank.
    14. Pedro de Araujo, 2008. "Socio-Economic Status, HIV/AIDS Knowledge and Stigma, and Sexual Behavior in India," Caepr Working Papers 2008-019_updated, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington.

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