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Marriage behavior response to prime-age adult mortality: evidence from malawi

  • Mika Ueyama

    ()

  • Futoshi Yamauchi

    ()

"This paper examines the effect of AIDS-related mortality of the prime-age adult population on marriage behavior among women in Malawi. A rise in prime-age adult mortality increases risks associated with the search for a marriage partner in the marriage market. A possible behavioral change in the marriage market in response to an increase in prime-age adult mortality is for marriage to occur earlier to avoid women's exposure to HIV/AIDS risks under the condition that the risks are higher during singlehood. We test this hypothesis using micro data from Malawi, where prime-age adult mortality has drastically increased. In the analysis, we estimate prime-age adult mortality that sample women have observed during the adolescent period by utilizing retrospective information on the death of their siblings. Empirical analysis shows that excess prime-age adult mortality observed in the local marriage market (district) lowers the marriage age for females and reduces their premarital sexual activities. Since a lower age for first marriage implies less schooling completed, we expect that the average schooling achievement among women would decline. This behavioral change also implies a longer reproduction period during their marriage, which may lead to a higher fertility rate. However, the second implication should be discounted if the reduction of sexual activities also applies to the married population. Lower schooling attainment among women has further implications on human capital formation in the next generation." from Author's Abstract

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1353/dem.0.0039
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Demography.

Volume (Year): 46 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 43-63

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Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:46:y:2009:i:1:p:43-63
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  1. Duncan Thomas, 1990. "Intra-Household Resource Allocation: An Inferential Approach," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(4), pages 635-664.
  2. Gillespie, Stuart, 2006. "AIDS, poverty, and hunger: challenges and responses," Food policy statements 43, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Mather, David & Donovan, Cynthia & Jayne, Thomas S. & Weber, Michael T. & Chapoto, Antony & Mazhangara, Edward & Mghenyi, Elliot W. & Bailey, Linda & Yoo, Kyeongwon & Yamano, Takashi, 2004. "A Cross-Country Analysis of Household Response to Adult Mortality in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa: Implications for HIV/AIDS Mitigation and Rural Development Policies," Food Security International Development Policy Syntheses 11322, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  4. Chapoto, Antony & Jayne, Thomas S., 2005. "Socio-economic Characteristics of Individuals Affected by AIDS-related Prime-age Mortality in Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 54613, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  5. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1995. "Learning by Doing and Learning from Others: Human Capital and Technical Change in Agriculture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1176-1209, December.
  6. Samuel Manda & Renate Meyer, 2005. "Age at first marriage in Malawi: a Bayesian multilevel analysis using a discrete time-to-event model," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 168(2), pages 439-455.
  7. Mark Gersovitz, 2005. "The HIV Epidemic in Four African Countries Seen through the Demographic and Health Surveys," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 14(2), pages 191-246, June.
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