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Social learning, selection, and HIV infection: Evidence from Malawi

Author

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  • Yamauchi, Futoshi
  • Ueyama, Mika

Abstract

"This paper examines social learning regarding HIV infection, using HIV test results and sibling death data from Malawi. In the analysis, we compare hypotheses on social learning, selection. and common factors. Empirical results show that young women are less likely to be HIV-infected if they observed prime-age deaths among their siblings, whereas HIV infection is found to be positively related to prime-age sibling deaths among older women. This supports the social-learning hypothesis. Notably, schooling reinforces the social-learning effect of sibling deaths on HIV infection in women regardless of age. The above findings are robust to age (cohort) effects and unobserved location factors." from authors' abstract

Suggested Citation

  • Yamauchi, Futoshi & Ueyama, Mika, 2008. "Social learning, selection, and HIV infection: Evidence from Malawi," IFPRI discussion papers 817, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:817
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    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp00817.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Timothy G. Conley & Christopher R. Udry, 2010. "Learning about a New Technology: Pineapple in Ghana," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 35-69, March.
    2. Kirsten P. Smith & Susan Cotts Watkins, 2005. "Perceptions of Risk and Strategies for Prevention: Responses to HIV/AIDS in Rural Malawi," PGDA Working Papers 0305, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    3. Laura Bernardi, 2002. "Determinants of individual AIDS risk perception: knowledge, behavioural control, and social influence," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2002-029, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Mika Ueyama & Futoshi Yamauchi, 2009. "Marriage behavior response to prime-age adult mortality: evidence from malawi," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 46(1), pages 43-63, February.
    5. Charles F. Manski, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(3), pages 531-542.
    6. Smith, Kirsten P. & Watkins, Susan Cotts, 2005. "Perceptions of risk and strategies for prevention: responses to HIV/AIDS in rural Malawi," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 649-660, February.
    7. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-846, September.
    8. Munshi, Kaivan, 2004. "Social learning in a heterogeneous population: technology diffusion in the Indian Green Revolution," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 185-213, February.
    9. Yamauchi, Futoshi, 2005. "Social learning, neighborhood effects, and investment in human capital," FCND briefs 190, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Susan Cotts Watkins, 2004. "Navigating the AIDS Epidemic in Rural Malawi," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 30(4), pages 673-705.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gani Aldashev & Jean-Marie Baland, 2012. "Awareness and AIDS: A Political Economy Perspective," Working Papers 1204, University of Namur, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social learning; HIV infection; AIDS (Disease) Africa; Sub-Saharan; siblings;

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