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The emerging fertility transition in sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Cohen, Barney

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  • Cohen, Barney, 1998. "The emerging fertility transition in sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(8), pages 1431-1461, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:26:y:1998:i:8:p:1431-1461
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Duncan Thomas & Ityai Muvandi, 1994. "The demographic transition in southern Africa: Another look at the evidence from Botswana and Zimbabwe," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(2), pages 185-207, May.
    2. Naomi Rutenberg & Ian Diamond, 1993. "Fertility in botswana: The recent decline and future prospects," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 30(2), pages 143-157, May.
    3. Cochrane, S.H. & Farid, S.M., 1989. "Fertility In Sub-Saharan Africa - Analysis And Explanation," World Bank - Discussion Papers 43, World Bank.
    4. Westoff, C.F., 1992. "Age at Marriage, Age at first Birth, and Fertility in Africa," Papers 169, World Bank - Technical Papers.
    5. Duncan Thomas & Ityai Muvandi, 1994. "The demographic transition in southern Africa: Reviewing the evidence from Botswana and Zimbabwe," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(2), pages 217-227, May.
    6. Orieji Chimere-Dan, 1997. "Recent fertility patterns and population policy in South Africa," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 1-20.
    7. Ann Blanc & Shea Rutstein, 1994. "The Demographic transition in southern Africa: Yet another look at the evidence from Botswana and Zimbabwe," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(2), pages 209-215, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Erica FIELD & Vera MOLITOR & Alice SCHOONBROODT & Michèle TERTILT, 2016. "Gender Gaps in Completed Fertility," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 82(2), pages 167-206, June.
    2. Bundervoet, Tom, 2014. "What explains Rwanda's drop in fertility between 2005 and 2010 ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6741, The World Bank.
    3. Pauline Rossi & Léa Rouanet, 2015. "Gender Preferences in Africa: A Comparative Analysis of Fertility Choices," Working Papers halshs-01074934, HAL.
    4. Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan, 2012. "AIDS, “reversal” of the demographic transition and economic development: evidence from Africa," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(3), pages 871-897, July.
    5. Lawrence Kazembe, 2009. "Modelling individual fertility levels in Malawian women: a spatial semiparametric regression model," Statistical Methods & Applications, Springer;Società Italiana di Statistica, vol. 18(2), pages 237-255, July.
    6. Cohen, Barney, 2004. "Urban Growth in Developing Countries: A Review of Current Trends and a Caution Regarding Existing Forecasts," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 23-51, January.
    7. Michael Lipton, 2001. "Reviving global poverty reduction: what role for genetically modified plants?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(7), pages 823-846.
    8. Rossi, Pauline & Rouanet, Léa, 2015. "Gender Preferences in Africa: A Comparative Analysis of Fertility Choices," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 326-345.
    9. James A. Levinsohn & Taryn Dinkelman & Rolang Majelantle, 2006. "When Knowledge is not Enough: HIV/AIDS Information and Risky Behavior in Botswana," NBER Working Papers 12418, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Mveyange Anthony, 2015. "On the fertility transition in Africa: Income, child mortality, or education?," WIDER Working Paper Series 089, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    11. Garenne, Michel & Joseph, Veronique, 2002. "The Timing of the Fertility Transition in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(10), pages 1835-1843, October.
    12. Ezra Gayawan & Samson B. Adebayo, 2013. "A Bayesian semiparametric multilevel survival modelling of age at first birth in Nigeria," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(45), pages 1339-1372, June.
    13. Parfait Eloundou-Enyegue & Sarah Giroux, 2012. "Fertility Transitions and Schooling: From Micro- to Macro-Level Associations," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(4), pages 1407-1432, November.

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