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The medium and long term effects of an expansion of education on poverty in Côte d'Ivoire. A dynamic microsimulation study

  • Michael Grimm


    (University of Göttingen, Department of Economics, DIW and DIAL)

I use a dynamic microsimulation model to analyse the distributional effects of an expansion of education in Côte d'Ivoire in the medium and long term (1998-2015). The simulations are performed in order to replicate several policies in force or subject to debate in this country. Various hypotheses concerning the evolution of returns to education and labour demand are tested. The direct effects between education and income as well as the different transmission channels, such as occupational choices, fertility, and household composition, are analysed. The effects of the educational expansion on the growth of household incomes, their distribution and poverty depend very crucially on the hypothesis made on the evolution of returns to education and labour demand. If returns to education remain constant and the labour market segmented, the effects will be very modest. _________________________________ J’utilise un modèle de micro-simulation dynamique pour analyser les effets distributifs d'une expansion de l'éducation en Côte d'Ivoire à moyen et long terme (1998-2015). Les simulations sont effectuées, selon plusieurs politiques actuellement en place ou en discussion dans ce pays. Des hypothèses variées concernant l'évolution du rendement de l'éducation et de la demande de travail sont examinées. Les effets directs entre éducation et revenu comme les différents canaux de transmission, tels que les choix d'activité, la fécondité et la composition des ménages sont analysés. Les effets de l'expansion de l'éducation sur la croissance des revenus des ménages, la distribution du revenu et la pauvreté dépendent de manière cruciale de l'hypothèse faite concernant l'évolution du rendement de l'éducation et de la demande de travail. Si le rendement de l'éducation reste constant et le marché du travail segmenté, les effets seront relativement modérés.

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Paper provided by DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation) in its series Working Papers with number DT/2002/12.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:dia:wpaper:dt200212
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  2. Pritchett, Lant, 1996. "Where has all the education gone?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1581, The World Bank.
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  12. Schultz, T. Paul, 1993. "Demand for children in low income countries," Handbook of Population and Family Economics, in: M. R. Rosenzweig & Stark, O. (ed.), Handbook of Population and Family Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 8, pages 349-430 Elsevier.
  13. Mesplé-Somps, Sandrine & Guénard, Charlotte & Grimm, Michael, 2002. "What has happened to the urban population in Côte d'Ivoire since the eighties? An analysis of monetary poverty and deprivation over 15 years of household data," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/4692, Paris Dauphine University.
  14. C. Mark Blackden, 1999. "Gender, Growth, and Poverty Reduction," World Bank Other Operational Studies 9873, The World Bank.
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  18. Paul Glewwe, 2002. "Schools and Skills in Developing Countries: Education Policies and Socioeconomic Outcomes," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 436-482, June.
  19. Forsythe, Nancy & Korzeniewicz, Roberto Patricio & Durrant, Valerie, 2000. "Gender Inequalities and Economic Growth: A Longitudinal Evaluation," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(3), pages 573-617, April.
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  21. Grimm, Michael, 2001. "A Decomposition of Inequality and Poverty Changes in the Context of Macroeconomic Adjustment: A Microsimulation Study for C.te d'Ivoire," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
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