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Two Perspectives on Preferences and Structural Transformation

  • Berthold Herrendorf
  • Richard Rogerson
  • ?kos Valentinyi

We assess the empirical importance of changes in income and relative prices for structural transformation in the postwar United States. We explain two natural approaches to the data: sectors may be categories of final expenditure or value added; e.g., the service sector may be the final expenditure on services or the value added from service industries. We estimate preferences for each approach and find that with final expenditure income effects are the dominant force behind structural transformation, whereas with value-added categories price effects are more important. We show how the inputoutput structure of the United States can reconcile these findings.

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Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 103 (2013)
Issue (Month): 7 (December)
Pages: 2752-89

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:103:y:2013:i:7:p:2752-89
Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.103.7.2752
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  1. Sergio Rebelo & Piyabha Kongsamut & Danyang Xie, 2001. "Beyond Balanced Growth," IMF Working Papers 01/85, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Margarida Duarte & Diego Restuccia, 2009. "The Role of the Structural Transformation in Aggregate Productivity," Working Papers tecipa-348, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  3. Victor R. Fuchs, 1968. "Some Implications of the Growth of a Service Economy," NBER Chapters, in: The Service Economy, pages 183-199 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. L. Rachel Ngai & Christopher A. Pissarides, 2007. "Structural Change in a Multisector Model of Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 429-443, March.
  5. Akos Valentinyi & Berthold Herrendorf, 2008. "Measuring Factor Income Shares at the Sectoral Level," IEHAS Discussion Papers 0803, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  6. Atkeson, Andrew & Ogaki, Masao, 1996. "Wealth-varying intertemporal elasticities of substitution: Evidence from panel and aggregate data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 507-534, December.
  7. Messina, Julian, 2006. "The role of product market regulations in the process of structural change," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(7), pages 1863-1890, October.
  8. Douglas Gollin & Stephen Parente & Richard Rogerson, 2002. "The Role of Agriculture in Development," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 160-164, May.
  9. Herrendorf, Berthold & Valentinyi, Akos, 2007. "Measuring Factor Income Shares at the Sector Level - A Primer," CEPR Discussion Papers 6271, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  10. Barnett, William A. & Serletis, Apostolos, 2008. "Consumer preferences and demand systems," MPRA Paper 8413, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. John Laitner, 2000. "Structural Change and Economic Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(3), pages 545-561.
  12. Francisco J. Buera & Joseph P. Kaboski, 2009. "Can Traditional Theories of Structural Change Fit The Data?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(2-3), pages 469-477, 04-05.
  13. Bah, El-hadj M., 2007. "Structural Transformation in Developed and Developing Countries," MPRA Paper 10655, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 19 Sep 2008.
  14. Arilton Teixeira & Berthold Herrendorf & James A. Schmitz Jr., 2009. "Transportation and Development:Insights from the U.S. 1840-1860," Fucape Working Papers 18, Fucape Business School.
  15. Foellmi, Reto & Zweimüller, Josef, 2008. "Structural change, Engel's consumption cycles and Kaldor's facts of economic growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(7), pages 1317-1328, October.
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