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Overestimating HIV infection:

Author

Listed:
  • Philip Anglewicz

    (Tulane University)

  • Hans-Peter Kohler

    (University of Pennsylvania)

Abstract

In the absence of HIV testing, how do rural Malawians assess their HIV status? In this paper, we use a unique dataset that includes respondents’ HIV status as well as their subjective likelihood of HIV infection. These data show that many rural Malawians overestimate their likelihood of current HIV infection. The discrepancy between actual and perceived status raises an important question: Why are so many wrong? We begin by identifying determinants of self-assessed HIV status, and then compare these assessments with HIV biomarker results. Finally, we ask what characteristics of individuals are associated with errors in self-assessments.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Anglewicz & Hans-Peter Kohler, 2009. "Overestimating HIV infection:," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 20(6), pages 65-96, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:20:y:2009:i:6
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol20/6/20-6.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Damien De Walque, 2007. "Sero‐Discordant Couples in Five African Countries: Implications for Prevention Strategies," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 33(3), pages 501-523, September.
    2. FFF1Amy NNN1Kaler, 2003. "My Girlfriends Could Fill A Yanu-Yanu Bus," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 1(11), pages 349-372, September.
    3. Hans-Peter Kohler, 1997. "Learning in social networks and contraceptive choice," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 34(3), pages 369-383, August.
    4. FFF1Michael NNN1Bracher & FFF2Gigi NNN2Santow & FFF2Susan NNN2Watkins, 2003. ""Moving" and Marrying," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 1(7), pages 207-246, September.
    5. Matthew Rabin, 1998. "Psychology and Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 11-46, March.
    6. Rebecca L. Thornton, 2008. "The Demand for, and Impact of, Learning HIV Status," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(5), pages 1829-1863, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    HIV/AIDS; perceived risk; sub-Saharan Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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