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Intergenerational Transfers in the Era of HIV/AIDS: Evidence from Rural Malawi

Author

Listed:
  • Iliana V. Kohler

    (University of Pennsylvania)

  • Hans-Peter Kohler

    (University of Pennsylvania)

  • Philip Anglewicz

    (Tulane University)

  • Jere Behrman

    (University of Pennsylvania)

Abstract

Intergenerational transfer patterns in sub-Saharan Africa are poorly understood, despite the alleged importance of support networks to ameliorate the complex implications of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on families. We estimate the age patterns and the multiple directions of transfer flows in rural Malawi---from prime-aged respondents to their elderly parents and adult children age 15+. Our findings include that: (1) financial net transfers are strongly age-patterned and the middle generations are net-providers of transfers; (2) non-financial transfers are based on mutual assistance rather than reallocation of resources; and (3) intergenerational transfers are generally not related to health status, including HIV+ status.

Suggested Citation

  • Iliana V. Kohler & Hans-Peter Kohler & Philip Anglewicz & Jere Behrman, 2012. "Intergenerational Transfers in the Era of HIV/AIDS: Evidence from Rural Malawi," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(27), pages 775-834, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:27:y:2012:i:27
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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol27/27/27-27.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0596-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:dem:demres:v:38:y:2018:i:14 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Dick Durevall & Annika Lindskog, 2016. "Adult Mortality, AIDS, and Fertility in Rural Malawi," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 54(3), pages 215-242, September.
    4. De Neve, Jan-Walter & Harling, Guy, 2017. "Offspring schooling associated with increased parental survival in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 149-157.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    age patterns of transfers; intergenerational transfers; Malawi; MLSFH; SSA; transfer flows;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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