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The Impact of Family Size and Sibling Structure on the Great Mexico-U.S. Migration

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  • Bratti, Massimiliano
  • Fiore, Simona
  • Mendola, Mariapia

Abstract

We investigate how fertility and demographic factors affect migration at the household level by assessing the causal effects of sibship size and structure on offspring's international migration. We use a rich demographic survey on the population of Mexico and exploit presumably exogenous variation in family size induced by biological fertility and infertility shocks. We further exploit cross-sibling differences to identify birth order, sibling-sex, and sibling-age composition effects on migration. We find that large families per se do not boost offspring out-migration. Yet, the likelihood of migrating is not equally distributed within a household, but is higher for sons and decreases sharply with birth order. The female migration disadvantage also varies with sibling composition by age and gender.

Suggested Citation

  • Bratti, Massimiliano & Fiore, Simona & Mendola, Mariapia, 2019. "The Impact of Family Size and Sibling Structure on the Great Mexico-U.S. Migration," GLO Discussion Paper Series 392, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:392
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    2. Jan Priebe, 2020. "Quasi-experimental evidence for the causal link between fertility and subjective well-being," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 33(3), pages 839-882, July.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    International Migration; Mexico; Family Size; Sibling Structure;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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