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Fertility Assimilation of Immigrants: Evidence from Count Data Models

Author

Listed:
  • Mayer, Jochen

    (University of Munich)

  • Riphahn, Regina T.

    () (University of Erlangen-Nuremberg)

Abstract

This study applies count data estimation techniques to investigate the fertility adjustment of immigrants in the destination country. Data on completed fertility are taken from the 1996 wave of the German Socioeconomic Panel (GSOEP). While the economic literature stresses the role of prices and incomes as determinants of fertility, the demographic literature discusses whether assimilation or disruption effects dominate immigrants’ fertility after migration. We find evidence in favor of the assimilation model according to which immigrant fertility converges to native levels over time. In addition, we confirm the negative impact of female human capital on fertility outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Mayer, Jochen & Riphahn, Regina T., 1999. "Fertility Assimilation of Immigrants: Evidence from Count Data Models," IZA Discussion Papers 52, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp52
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Baker & Dwayne Benjamin, 1995. "The Receipt of Transfer Payments by Immigrants to Canada," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(4), pages 650-676.
    2. Winkelmann, Rainer, 1995. "Duration Dependence and Dispersion in Count-Data Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 13(4), pages 467-474, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    assimilation; immigrant fertility; Count data estimation; disruption;

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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