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Mexican Immigration to the United States

Author

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  • George J. Borjas

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • George J. Borjas, 2007. "Mexican Immigration to the United States," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number borj06-1, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberbk:borj06-1
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ullmann, S. Heidi & Goldman, Noreen & Massey, Douglas S., 2011. "Healthier before they migrate, less healthy when they return? The health of returned migrants in Mexico," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(3), pages 421-428, August.
    2. Jean-François Maystadt & Valerie Mueller & Ashwini Sebastian, 2016. "Environmental Migration and Labor Markets in Nepal," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(2), pages 417-452.
    3. Hunt, Jennifer, 2012. "The Impact of Immigration on the Educational Attainment of Natives," IZA Discussion Papers 6904, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Evren Ceritoglu & H. Burcu Gurcihan Yunculer & Huzeyfe Torun & Semih Tumen, 2017. "The impact of Syrian refugees on natives’ labor market outcomes in Turkey: evidence from a quasi-experimental design," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-28, December.
    5. repec:bla:intmig:v:51:y:2017:i:1:p:3-36 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Isabelle Chort & Maëlys Rupelle, 2016. "Determinants of Mexico-U.S. Outward and Return Migration Flows: A State-Level Panel Data Analysis," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(5), pages 1453-1476, October.
    7. Ljubica Nedelkoska & Ricardo Hausmann, 2017. "Welcome Home in a Crisis: Effects of Return Migration on the Non-migrants' Wages and Employment," CID Working Papers 330, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    8. Neeraj Kaushal & Yao Lu & Nicole Denier & Julia Shu-Huah Wang & Stephen J. Trejo, 2016. "Immigrant employment and earnings growth in Canada and the USA: evidence from longitudinal data," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(4), pages 1249-1277, October.
    9. Daniel Vaughan, 2013. "Nurture vs. Nurture: Endogenous Parental and Peer Effects and the Transmission of Culture," Working Papers 2013-04, Banco de México.
    10. Stefano Staffolani & Enzo Valentini, 2010. "Does Immigration Raise Blue and White Collar Wages of Natives? The Case of Italy," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(3), pages 295-310, September.
    11. George J. Borjas & Jeffrey Grogger & Gordon H. Hanson, 2010. "Immigration and the Economic Status of African-American Men," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 77(306), pages 255-282, April.
    12. Raphael, Steven, 2009. "International Migration, Sex Ratios, and the Socioeconomic Outcomes of Non-migrant Mexican Women," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt93s880fs, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
    13. Huffman, Wallace, 2007. "Demand for Farm Labor in the Coastal Fruit and Salad Bowl States Relative to Midland States: Four Decades of Experience," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12827, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    14. Khraiche, Maroula, 2015. "A Macroeconomic Analysis Of Guest Worker Permits," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 19(01), pages 189-220, January.
    15. Anthony Edo & Farid Toubal, 2015. "Selective Immigration Policies and Wages Inequality," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(1), pages 160-187, February.
    16. Pedro P. Orraca-Romano & Erika García-Meneses, 2016. "Why are the wages of the Mexican immigrants and their descendants so low in the United States?," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 31(2), pages 305-337.
    17. Jongkwan Lee & Giovanni Peri & Vasil Yasenov, 2017. "The Employment Effects of Mexican Repatriations: Evidence from the 1930's," NBER Working Papers 23885, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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