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Empirically probing the quantity-quality model

Author

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  • Emla Fitzsimons

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and Institute of Education, University of London)

  • Bansi Malde

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and Institute for Fiscal Studies)

Abstract

This paper tests whether family size has a causal effect on girls' education in Mexico. It exploits son preference as the main source of random variation in the propensity to have more children, and estimates causal effects using instrumental variables. Overall, it finds no evidence of family size having an adverse effect on education, once the endogeneity of family size is accounted for. Results are robust to another commonly used instrument in this literature, the occurrence of twin births. A divisive concern throughout this literature is that the instruments are invalid, so that inferences including policy recommendations may be misleading. An important contribution of this paper is to allow for the possibility that the instruments are invalid and to provide an answer to the question of just how much the assumption of instrument exogeneity drives findings. It concludes that the assumption of exogeneity does not affect the results that much, and the effects of family size on girls' schooling remain extremely modest at most.

Suggested Citation

  • Emla Fitzsimons & Bansi Malde, 2010. "Empirically probing the quantity-quality model," IFS Working Papers W10/20, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:ifsewp:10/20
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Junsen Zhang, 2017. "The Evolution of China's One-Child Policy and Its Effects on Family Outcomes," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 31(1), pages 141-160, Winter.
    2. Binelli, Chiara & Rubio-Codina, Marta, 2013. "The Returns to Private Education: Evidence from Mexico," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 198-215.
    3. Masahiro Shoji & Kenmei Tsubota, 2018. "Sexual Exploitation of Trafficked Children: Evidence from Bangladesh," Working Papers 175, JICA Research Institute.
    4. Sonia Bhalotra & Damian Clarke, 2016. "The Twin Instrument," CSAE Working Paper Series 2016-38, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    5. Haoming Liu, 2015. "The quantity–quality fertility–education trade-off," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 143-143, May.
    6. Chiara Binelli, 2016. "Wage inequality and informality: evidence from Mexico," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-18, December.
    7. repec:eee:jcecon:v:45:y:2017:i:2:p:246-260 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Holford, Angus, 2015. "Youth employment and academic performance: production functions and policy effects," ISER Working Paper Series 2015-06, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    9. Mehtabul Azam & Chan Hang Saing, 2017. "Is there really a trade-off? Family Size and Investment in Child Quality in India," Economics Working Paper Series 1712, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
    10. Loren Brandt & Aloysius Siow & Hui Wang, 2015. "Compensating for unequal parental investments in schooling," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(2), pages 423-462, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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