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Peer effects in learning HIV results

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  • Godlonton, Susan
  • Thornton, Rebecca

Abstract

How do neighbors positively or negatively influence individuals living in rural Malawi to learn their HIV results? Using data of location of homes and distance to neighbors, we measure the social network effects of neighbors' learning their HIV results on individuals own learning. Using the fact that neighbors were randomly offered monetary incentives of varying amounts to learn their HIV results, we find positive effects of neighbors attending clinics on others living nearby: a 10 percentage point increase of the percentage of neighbors (approximately 2.4 individuals) learning their HIV results increases the probability of learning HIV results by 1.1 percentage points. The strongest network effects are among closest neighbors; we find no effect among religious social networks. We also find a negative interaction between direct cash incentives and peers: the effect of peers doubles among those who were not offered any individual financial incentive to learn their HIV results.

Suggested Citation

  • Godlonton, Susan & Thornton, Rebecca, 2012. "Peer effects in learning HIV results," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(1), pages 118-129.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:97:y:2012:i:1:p:118-129
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jdeveco.2010.12.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Susan Godlonton & Rebecca L. Thornton, 2013. "Learning from Others' HIV Testing: Updating Beliefs and Responding to Risk," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 439-444, May.
    2. Carranza,Eliana & Meeks,Robyn, 2016. "Shedding light : understanding energy efficiency and electricity reliability," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7891, The World Bank.
    3. Jacopo Bonan & Pietro Battiston & Jaimie Bleck & Philippe LeMay-Boucher & Stefano Pareglio & Bassirou Sarr & Massimo Tavoni, 2017. "Social Interaction and Technology Adoption: Experimental Evidence from Improved Cookstoves in Mali," Working Papers 2017.47, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    4. Rebecca Mary Myerson & Darius Lakdawalla & Lisandro D. Colantonio & Monika Safford & David Meltzer, 2018. "Effects of Expanding Health Screening on Treatment - What Should We Expect? What Can We Learn?," NBER Working Papers 24347, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Singh, Prakarsh, 2016. "Learning and Behavioral Spillovers of Nutritional Information," IZA Discussion Papers 10085, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Saak, Alexander E. & Hennessy, David A., 2016. "A model of reporting and controlling outbreaks by public health agencies:," IFPRI discussion papers 1529, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Ariel BenYishay & A. Mushfiq Mobarak, 2014. "Social Learning and Communication," NBER Working Papers 20139, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. RyokoSato & Yoshito Takasaki, 2016. "Peer Effects on Vaccination: Experimental Evidence from Rural Nigeria," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1002, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    9. Emily Oster & Rebecca Thornton, 2012. "Determinants Of Technology Adoption: Peer Effects In Menstrual Cup Take-Up," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(6), pages 1263-1293, December.
    10. Arimoto, Yutaka & Ito, Seiro & Kudo, Yuya & Tsukada, Kazunari, 2013. "Stigma, Social Relationship and HIV Testing in the Workplace: Evidence from South Africa," CEI Working Paper Series 2012-06, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    11. Antonia Grohmann & Sahra Sakha, 2015. "The Effect of Peer Observation on Consumption Choices: Experimental Evidence," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1525, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    12. Dimitris Batzilis & Taryn Dinkelman & Emily Oster & Rebecca Thornton & Deric Zanera, 2014. "New Cellular Networks in Malawi: Correlates of Service Rollout and Network Performance," NBER Chapters,in: African Successes, Volume III: Modernization and Development, pages 215-245 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Jaime Torres, Mónica Marcela & Carlsson, Fredrik, 2016. "Social Norms and Information Diffusion in Water-saving Programs: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment in Colombia," Working Papers in Economics 652, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    14. repec:eee:jeeman:v:86:y:2017:i:c:p:121-140 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Lucia Corno, 2012. "Peer Effects on Criminal Behavior. Evidence from the homeless," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2012015, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
    16. Powell-Jackson, Timothy & Ansah, Evelyn K., 2015. "The indirect effects of subsidised healthcare in rural Ghana," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 96-103.
    17. Kim, Jinho, 2016. "The effect of peers on HIV infection expectations among Malawian adolescents: Using an instrumental variables/school fixed effect approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 61-69.
    18. Ariel BenYishay & A. Mushfiq Mobarak, 2013. "Communicating with Farmers through Social Networks," Working Papers 1030, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    19. Rebecca Myerson & Darius Lakdawalla & Lisandro D. Colantonio & Monika Safford & David Meltzer, 2018. "Effects of expanding health screening on treatment – What should we expect? What can we learn?," Working Papers 2018-014, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    20. Pascaline Dupas & Edward Miguel, 2016. "Impacts and Determinants of Health Levels in Low-Income Countries," NBER Working Papers 22235, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Burhan, Nik Ahmad Sufian & Sidek, Abdul Halim & Kurniawan, Yohan & Mohamad, Mohd Rosli, 2014. "Has Globalization Triggered Collective Impact of National Intelligence on Economic Growth?," MPRA Paper 77316, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    22. Arimoto, Yutaka & Hori, Narumi & Ito, Seiro & Kudo, Yuya & Tsukada, Kazunari, 2016. "Impacts of an HIV counseling and testing initiative -- results from an experimental intervention in a large firm in South Africa," IDE Discussion Papers 597, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    23. Kondylis, Florence & Mueller, Valerie, 2012. "Seeing is Believing? Evidence from a Demonstration Plot Experiment in Mozambique:," MSSP working papers 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Peer effects; Randomized evaluation; Incentives; HIV prevention; Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior

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