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Susan Godlonton

Personal Details

First Name:Susan
Middle Name:
Last Name:Godlonton
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pgo596
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
24 Hopkins Dr Schapiro Hall, Rm 316
Terminal Degree: (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(50%) International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.ifpri.org/

: 202-862-5600
202-467-4439
1201 Eye Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005-3915
RePEc:edi:ifprius (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Economics Department
Williams College

Williamstown, Massachusetts (United States)
http://econ.williams.edu/

: 413-597-2476
413-597-4045
24 Hopkins Hall Drive, Schapiro Building, Williamstown, MA 01267
RePEc:edi:edwilus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Kate Ambler & Alan de Brauw & Susan Godlonton, 2017. "Adapter Fomento à des pays d'Afrique sub-saharienne," One Pager French 325, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  2. Ambler, Kate & de Brauw, Alan & Godlonton, Susan, 2017. "Measuring postharvest losses at the farm level in Malawi," IFPRI discussion papers 1632, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Ambler, Kate & de Brauw, Alan & Godlonton, Susan, 2017. "Cash transfers and management advice for agriculture: Evidence from Senegal:," IFPRI discussion papers 1659, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Kate Ambler & Alan de Brauw & Susan Godlonton, 2016. "Adapting Fomento to countries in Sub-Saharan Africa," One Pager 325, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  5. Susan Godlonton, 2016. "Employment Exposure: Employment and Wage Effects in Urban Malawi," Department of Economics Working Papers 2016-09, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  6. Susan Godlonton & Manuel A. Hernandez & Mike Murphy, 2016. "Anchoring Bias in Recall Data: Evidence from Central America," Department of Economics Working Papers 2016-11, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  7. Susan Godlonton & Edward N. Okeke, 2015. "Does a Ban on Informal Health Providers Save Lives? Evidence from Malawi," Working Papers WR-1073-1, RAND Corporation.
  8. Godlonton, Susan, 2014. "Employment risk and job-seeker performance:," IFPRI discussion papers 1332, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  9. Brendan Maughan-Brown & Susan Godlonton & Rebecca L. Thornton & Atheendar S Venkataramani, 2013. "What do people actually learn from public health education campaigns? Incorrect inferences about male circumcision and female HIV infection risk in a cluster randomized trial in Malawi," SALDRU Working Papers 104, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  10. Susan Godlonton & Justine Burns, 2006. "Social Networks, Employment and Worker Discouragement: Evidence from South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 6, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  11. Susan Godlonton & Malcolm Keswell, 2004. "The impact of health on poverty: Evidence from the South African integrated family survey," SALDRU/CSSR Working Papers 081, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

Articles

  1. Susan Godlonton & Manuel A Hernandez & Mike Murphy, 2018. "Anchoring Bias in Recall Data: Evidence from Central America," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 100(2), pages 479-501.
  2. Susan Godlonton & Alister Munthali & Rebecca Thornton, 2016. "Responding to Risk: Circumcision, Information, and HIV Prevention," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(2), pages 333-349, May.
  3. Godlonton, Susan & Okeke, Edward N., 2016. "Does a ban on informal health providers save lives? Evidence from Malawi," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 112-132.
  4. Jobiba Chinkhumba & Susan Godlonton & Rebecca Thornton, 2014. "The Demand for Medical Male Circumcision," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 152-177, April.
  5. Okeke, Edward N. & Godlonton, Susan, 2014. "Doing wrong to do right? Social preferences and dishonest behavior," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 124-139.
  6. Susan Godlonton & Rebecca L. Thornton, 2013. "Learning from Others' HIV Testing: Updating Beliefs and Responding to Risk," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 439-444, May.
  7. Godlonton, Susan & Thornton, Rebecca, 2012. "Peer effects in learning HIV results," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(1), pages 118-129.
  8. Burns, Justine & Godlonton, Susan & Keswell, Malcolm, 2010. "Social networks, employment and worker discouragement: Evidence from South Africa," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 336-344, April.
  9. Susan Godlonton & Malcolm Keswell, 2005. "The Impact Of Health On Poverty: Evidence From The South African Integrated Family Survey," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 73(1), pages 133-148, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Jobiba Chinkhumba & Susan Godlonton & Rebecca Thornton, 2014. "The Demand for Medical Male Circumcision," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 152-177, April.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Male Circumcision
      by René Böheim in Econ Tidbits on 2014-05-08 12:11:00

Working papers

  1. Susan Godlonton & Manuel A. Hernandez & Mike Murphy, 2016. "Anchoring Bias in Recall Data: Evidence from Central America," Department of Economics Working Papers 2016-11, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    Cited by:

    1. Arthi, Vellore & Beegle, Kathleen & De Weerdt, Joachim & Palacios-López, Amparo, 2018. "Not your average job: Measuring farm labor in Tanzania," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 160-172.

  2. Susan Godlonton & Edward N. Okeke, 2015. "Does a Ban on Informal Health Providers Save Lives? Evidence from Malawi," Working Papers WR-1073-1, RAND Corporation.

    Cited by:

    1. Okeke, Edward N. & Chari, A.V., 2018. "Health care at birth and infant mortality: Evidence from nighttime deliveries in Nigeria," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 196(C), pages 86-95.

  3. Godlonton, Susan, 2014. "Employment risk and job-seeker performance:," IFPRI discussion papers 1332, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Cited by:

    1. Susan Godlonton, 2016. "Employment Exposure: Employment and Wage Effects in Urban Malawi," Department of Economics Working Papers 2016-09, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    2. Häberli, Christian, 2016. "An International Regulatory Framework for National Employment Policies," Papers 963, World Trade Institute.

  4. Susan Godlonton & Justine Burns, 2006. "Social Networks, Employment and Worker Discouragement: Evidence from South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 6, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

    Cited by:

    1. Susan Godlonton, 2014. "Employment Risk and Job-Seeker Performance," Department of Economics Working Papers 2016-10, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Jun 2016.
    2. Ramírez, Eduardo & Ruben, Ruerd, 2015. "Gender Systems and Women’s Labor Force Participation in the Salmon Industry in Chiloé, Chile," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 96-104.
    3. Alfred Kechia Mukong, 2016. "Peer Networks and Tobacco Consumption in South Africa," Working Papers 586, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    4. Ayça Akarçay Gürbüz & Sezgin Polat & Mustafa Ulus, 2014. "In Limbo: Exploring Transition to Discouragement," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 26(4), pages 527-551, September.
    5. KUEPIE Mathias & TENIKUE Michel & WALTHER Olivier, 2014. "Small businesses performance in West African border regions: Do social networks pay off?," LISER Working Paper Series 2014-06, LISER.
    6. Emily Frame & Ariane de Lannoy & Murray Leibbrandt, 2016. "Measuring multidimensional poverty among youth in South Africa at the sub-national level," SALDRU Working Papers 169, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    7. Miracle Ntuli & Prudence Kwenda, 2013. "Labour Unions and Wage Inequality Among African Men in South Africa," Working Papers 13159, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    8. Rao, Neel, 2016. "Social effects in employer learning: An analysis of siblings," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 24-36.

  5. Susan Godlonton & Malcolm Keswell, 2004. "The impact of health on poverty: Evidence from the South African integrated family survey," SALDRU/CSSR Working Papers 081, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

    Cited by:

    1. Mussa, Richard, 2009. "Impact of fertility on objective and subjective poverty in Malawi," MPRA Paper 16089, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. cyrine hannafi & Christophe Muller, 2016. "The Poverty-Economic Growth-Health Triangle," EcoMod2016 9587, EcoMod.
    3. Martine Visser & Frikkie Booysen, 2004. "Determinants of the choice of health care facility utilised by individuals in HIV/AIDS-affected households in the Free State province of South Africa," SALDRU/CSSR Working Papers 087, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    4. Leonardo Becchetti & Giuseppina Gianfreda, 2008. "When consumption heals producers: the effect of fair trade on marginalised producers’ health and productivity," Working Papers 86, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    5. Katherine Eyal & Justine Burns, 2016. "Up or Down? Intergenerational Mental Health Transmission and Cash Transfers in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 165, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

Articles

  1. Susan Godlonton & Alister Munthali & Rebecca Thornton, 2016. "Responding to Risk: Circumcision, Information, and HIV Prevention," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(2), pages 333-349, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Yao, Yao, 2016. "Fertility and HIV risk in Africa," Working Paper Series 5342, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    2. Dupas, Pascaline & Huillery, Elise & Seban, Juliette, 2018. "Risk information, risk salience, and adolescent sexual behavior: Experimental evidence from Cameroon," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 151-175.
    3. Edward N. Okeke & Amalavoyal Chari & Clement A. Adepiti, 2016. "Does Price Affect the Demand for Information about New Health Technologies? Evidence from a Field Experiment in Nigeria," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(3), pages 437-469.
    4. Wilson, Nicholas & Janicki, Martha, 2016. "A cut above the rest? Private anthropometrics in marriage markets," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 164-179.
    5. Pascaline Dupas & Edward Miguel, 2016. "Impacts and Determinants of Health Levels in Low-Income Countries," NBER Working Papers 22235, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Godlonton, Susan & Okeke, Edward N., 2016. "Does a ban on informal health providers save lives? Evidence from Malawi," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 112-132.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Jobiba Chinkhumba & Susan Godlonton & Rebecca Thornton, 2014. "The Demand for Medical Male Circumcision," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 152-177, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Peters, Jörg & Langbein, Jörg & Roberts, Gareth, 2017. "Generalization in the Tropics: Development policy, randomized controlled trials, and external validity," Ruhr Economic Papers 716, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    2. Peters, Jörg & Langbein, Jörg & Roberts, Gareth, 2015. "Policy evaluation, randomized controlled trials, and external validity: A systematic review," Ruhr Economic Papers 589, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    3. Laura Derksen & Adamson Muula & Joep van Oosterhout, 2016. "Love in the Time of HIV: Testing as a Signal of Risk," Natural Field Experiments 00550, The Field Experiments Website.
    4. Molina Millán, Teresa & Macours, Karen, 2017. "Attrition in Randomized Control Trials: Using Tracking Information to Correct Bias," IZA Discussion Papers 10711, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Hsu, Yu-Chin & Huber, Martin & Lai, Tsung Chih, 2017. "Nonparametric estimation of natural direct and indirect effects based on inverse probability weighting," FSES Working Papers 482, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Freiburg/Fribourg Switzerland.
    6. Edward N. Okeke & Amalavoyal Chari & Clement A. Adepiti, 2016. "Does Price Affect the Demand for Information about New Health Technologies? Evidence from a Field Experiment in Nigeria," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(3), pages 437-469.
    7. Pascaline Dupas & Edward Miguel, 2016. "Impacts and Determinants of Health Levels in Low-Income Countries," NBER Working Papers 22235, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Rebecca L. Thornton & Hans-Peter Kohler, 2017. "Making marriages last: trust is good, but credible information is better," WIDER Working Paper Series 173, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

  4. Okeke, Edward N. & Godlonton, Susan, 2014. "Doing wrong to do right? Social preferences and dishonest behavior," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 124-139.

    Cited by:

    1. Grosch, Kerstin & Rau, Holger, 2017. "Gender differences in honesty: The role of social value orientation," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 308, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    2. Grosch, Kerstin & Rau, Holger A., 2017. "Gender differences in honesty: The role of social value orientation," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 258-267.
    3. Edward N. Okeke & Amalavoyal Chari & Clement A. Adepiti, 2016. "Does Price Affect the Demand for Information about New Health Technologies? Evidence from a Field Experiment in Nigeria," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64(3), pages 437-469.

  5. Susan Godlonton & Rebecca L. Thornton, 2013. "Learning from Others' HIV Testing: Updating Beliefs and Responding to Risk," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 439-444, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Marlène Guillon & Josselin Thuilliez, 2015. "HIV and Rational risky behaviors: a systematic review of published empirical literature (1990-2013)," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 15065, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    2. Daniela Iorio & Raül Santaeulàlia-Llopis, 2011. "Education, HIV Status, and Risky Sexual Behavior: How Much Does the Stage of the HIV Epidemic Matter?," Working Papers 624, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    3. Jaime Torres, Mónica Marcela & Carlsson, Fredrik, 2016. "Social Norms and Information Diffusion in Water-saving Programs: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment in Colombia," Working Papers in Economics 652, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    4. Molina Millán, Teresa & Macours, Karen, 2017. "Attrition in Randomized Control Trials: Using Tracking Information to Correct Bias," IZA Discussion Papers 10711, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Andrew T. Ching & Tülin Erdem & Michael P. Keane, 2016. "Empirical Models of Learning Dynamics: A Survey of Recent Developments," Economics Papers 2016-W12, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    6. Victoria Baranov & Hans-Peter Kohler, 2015. "The Impact of AIDS Treatment on Savings and Human Capital Investment in Malawi," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 2001, The University of Melbourne.

  6. Godlonton, Susan & Thornton, Rebecca, 2012. "Peer effects in learning HIV results," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(1), pages 118-129.

    Cited by:

    1. Susan Godlonton & Rebecca L. Thornton, 2013. "Learning from Others' HIV Testing: Updating Beliefs and Responding to Risk," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 439-444, May.
    2. Eliana Carranza & Robyn Meeks, 2016. "Shedding Light: Understanding Energy Efficiency and Electricity Reliability in Developing Countries," Natural Field Experiments 00569, The Field Experiments Website.
    3. Jacopo Bonan & Pietro Battiston & Jaimie Bleck & Philippe LeMay Boucher & Stefano Pareglio & Bassirou Sarr & Massimo Tavoni, 2018. "Social Interaction and Technology Adoption: Experimental Evidence from Improved Cookstoves in Mali," Development Working Papers 431, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 29 Jan 2018.
    4. Rebecca Mary Myerson & Darius Lakdawalla & Lisandro D. Colantonio & Monika Safford & David Meltzer, 2018. "Effects of Expanding Health Screening on Treatment - What Should We Expect? What Can We Learn?," NBER Working Papers 24347, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Singh, Prakarsh, 2016. "Learning and Behavioral Spillovers of Nutritional Information," IZA Discussion Papers 10085, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Saak, Alexander E. & Hennessy, David A., 2016. "A model of reporting and controlling outbreaks by public health agencies:," IFPRI discussion papers 1529, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Ariel BenYishay & A. Mushfiq Mobarak, 2014. "Social Learning and Communication," NBER Working Papers 20139, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. RyokoSato & Yoshito Takasaki, 2016. "Peer Effects on Vaccination: Experimental Evidence from Rural Nigeria," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1002, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    9. Emily Oster & Rebecca Thornton, 2012. "Determinants Of Technology Adoption: Peer Effects In Menstrual Cup Take-Up," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 10(6), pages 1263-1293, December.
    10. Arimoto, Yutaka & Ito, Seiro & Kudo, Yuya & Tsukada, Kazunari, 2013. "Stigma, social relationship and HIV testing in the workplace : evidence from South Africa," IDE Discussion Papers 386, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    11. Antonia Grohmann & Sahra Sakha, 2015. "The Effect of Peer Observation on Consumption Choices: Experimental Evidence," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1525, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    12. Dimitris Batzilis & Taryn Dinkelman & Emily Oster & Rebecca Thornton & Deric Zanera, 2014. "New Cellular Networks in Malawi: Correlates of Service Rollout and Network Performance," NBER Chapters,in: African Successes, Volume III: Modernization and Development, pages 215-245 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Jaime Torres, Mónica Marcela & Carlsson, Fredrik, 2016. "Social Norms and Information Diffusion in Water-saving Programs: Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment in Colombia," Working Papers in Economics 652, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    14. Ben Yishay, Ariel & Fraker, Andrew & Guiteras, Raymond & Palloni, Giordano & Shah, Neil Buddy & Shirrell, Stuart & Wang, Paul, 2017. "Microcredit and willingness to pay for environmental quality: Evidence from a randomized-controlled trial of finance for sanitation in rural Cambodia," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 121-140.
    15. Lucia Corno, 2012. "Peer Effects on Criminal Behavior. Evidence from the homeless," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1204, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    16. Powell-Jackson, Timothy & Ansah, Evelyn K., 2015. "The indirect effects of subsidised healthcare in rural Ghana," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 96-103.
    17. Kim, Jinho, 2016. "The effect of peers on HIV infection expectations among Malawian adolescents: Using an instrumental variables/school fixed effect approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 61-69.
    18. BenYishay, Ariel & Mobarak, A. Mushfiq, 2013. "Communicating with Farmers through Social Networks," Working Papers 121, Yale University, Department of Economics.
    19. Chatterjee, Chirantan & Joshi, Radhika & Sood, Neeraj & Boregowda, P., 2018. "Government health insurance and spatial peer effects: New evidence from India," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 196(C), pages 131-141.
    20. Rebecca Myerson & Darius Lakdawalla & Lisandro D. Colantonio & Monika Safford & David Meltzer, 2018. "Effects of expanding health screening on treatment – What should we expect? What can we learn?," Working Papers 2018-014, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    21. Pascaline Dupas & Edward Miguel, 2016. "Impacts and Determinants of Health Levels in Low-Income Countries," NBER Working Papers 22235, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    22. Burhan, Nik Ahmad Sufian & Sidek, Abdul Halim & Kurniawan, Yohan & Mohamad, Mohd Rosli, 2014. "Has Globalization Triggered Collective Impact of National Intelligence on Economic Growth?," MPRA Paper 77316, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    23. Arimoto, Yutaka & Hori, Narumi & Ito, Seiro & Kudo, Yuya & Tsukada, Kazunari, 2016. "Impacts of an HIV counseling and testing initiative -- results from an experimental intervention in a large firm in South Africa," IDE Discussion Papers 597, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    24. Kondylis, Florence & Mueller, Valerie, 2012. "Seeing is Believing? Evidence from a Demonstration Plot Experiment in Mozambique:," MSSP working papers 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    25. Singh, Prakarsh, 2011. "Spillovers in learning and behavior: Evidence from a nutritional information campaign in urban slums," MPRA Paper 33362, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  7. Burns, Justine & Godlonton, Susan & Keswell, Malcolm, 2010. "Social networks, employment and worker discouragement: Evidence from South Africa," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 336-344, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  8. Susan Godlonton & Malcolm Keswell, 2005. "The Impact Of Health On Poverty: Evidence From The South African Integrated Family Survey," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 73(1), pages 133-148, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 8 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEV: Development (3) 2014-05-04 2017-05-14 2017-08-27
  2. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (2) 2017-05-14 2017-08-27
  3. NEP-AFR: Africa (1) 2014-05-04
  4. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (1) 2017-05-14
  5. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2017-08-27
  6. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2014-05-04
  7. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2014-04-05
  8. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2014-04-05

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