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Cash transfers and management advice for agriculture: Evidence from Senegal:

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  • Ambler, Kate
  • de Brauw, Alan
  • Godlonton, Susan

Abstract

This study analyzes impacts of large, one-time cash transfers and farm management plans among farmers in Senegal. Farmers were randomized into groups receiving advisory visits, the visits and an individualized farm plan, or the visits, the plan, and a cash transfer. After one year, crop production and livestock ownership were higher in the transfer group relative to the group that only received visits. Livestock gains persisted after two years. Results suggest that the plans increased crop production in year one, but there is no other evidence that the plans were effective when not accompanied by a transfer.

Suggested Citation

  • Ambler, Kate & de Brauw, Alan & Godlonton, Susan, 2017. "Cash transfers and management advice for agriculture: Evidence from Senegal:," IFPRI discussion papers 1659, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1659
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    Cited by:

    1. Gashaw Tadesse Abate & Tanguy Bernard & Alan de Brauw & Nicholas Minot, 2018. "The impact of the use of new technologies on farmers’ wheat yield in Ethiopia: evidence from a randomized control trial," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 49(4), pages 409-421, July.
    2. Kate Ambler & Alan de Brauw & Susan Godlonton, 2018. "Rural Labor Market Responses to Large Lumpy Cash Transfers: Evidence from Malawi," Department of Economics Working Papers 2018-11, Department of Economics, Williams College.

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    Keywords

    agriculture; livestock;

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