IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/pam141.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Kate Ambler

Personal Details

First Name:Kate
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ambler
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pam141
https://sites.google.com/site/kateambler/

Affiliation

International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.ifpri.org/
RePEc:edi:ifprius (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Kate Ambler & Susan Godlonton, 2020. "Information Asymmetries and Remittance Recipient Income: A Field Experiment in Malawi," Department of Economics Working Papers 2020-12, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  2. Kate Ambler & Susan Godlonton, 2019. "Windfalls and work requirements: Evidence from a field experiment in Malawi," Department of Economics Working Papers 2019-25, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  3. Kate Ambler & Susan Godlonton & María P. Recalde, 2019. "Follow the leader? A field experiment on social influence," Department of Economics Working Papers 2019-24, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  4. Kate Ambler & Alan de Brauw & Susan Godlonton, 2019. "Lump-sum Transfers for Agriculture and Household Decision Making," Department of Economics Working Papers 2019-19, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  5. Kate Ambler & Alan de Brauw & Susan Godlonton, 2018. "Rural Labor Market Responses to Large Lumpy Cash Transfers: Evidence from Malawi," Department of Economics Working Papers 2018-11, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  6. Ambler, Kate & Doss, Cheryl & Kieran, Caitlin & Passarelli, Simone, 2017. "He says, she says: Exploring patterns of spousal agreement in Bangladesh," IFPRI discussion papers 1616, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Ambler, Kate & de Brauw, Alan & Godlonton, Susan, 2017. "Measuring postharvest losses at the farm level in Malawi," IFPRI discussion papers 1632, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. Ambler, Kate & De Brauw,Alan, 2017. "The impacts of cash transfers on women?s empowerment : learning from Pakistan?s BISP program," Policy Research Working Paper Series 113161, The World Bank.
  9. Ambler, Kate & de Brauw, Alan & Godlonton, Susan, 2017. "Cash transfers and management advice for agriculture: Evidence from Senegal:," IFPRI discussion papers 1659, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  10. Kate Ambler & Alan de Brauw & Susan Godlonton, 2016. "Adapting Fomento to countries in Sub-Saharan Africa," One Pager 325, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  11. Kate Ambler & Diego Aycinena & Dean Yang, 2014. "Channeling Remittances to Education: A Field Experiment Among Migrants from El Salvador," NBER Working Papers 20262, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Kate Ambler & Diego Aycinena & Dean Yang, 2014. "Remittance Responses to Temporary Discounts: A Field Experiment among Central American Migrants," NBER Working Papers 20522, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Ambler, Kate, 2013. "Don’t tell on me: Experimental evidence of asymmetric information in transnational households:," IFPRI discussion papers 1312, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

Articles

  1. Kate Ambler, 2016. "Bargaining with Grandma: The Impact of the South African Pension on Household Decision-Making," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 51(4), pages 900-932.
  2. Kate Ambler & Diego Aycinena & Dean Yang, 2015. "Channeling Remittances to Education: A Field Experiment among Migrants from El Salvador," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 207-232, April.
  3. Ambler, Kate, 2015. "Don't tell on me: Experimental evidence of asymmetric information in transnational households," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 52-69.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Kate Ambler & Alan de Brauw & Susan Godlonton, 2019. "Lump-sum Transfers for Agriculture and Household Decision Making," Department of Economics Working Papers 2019-19, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    Cited by:

    1. Tehmeena Iqbal & Shujaat Farooq & Ihtsham Ul Haq Padda, 2021. "Can Empowerment be Enhanced by Putting Cash in the Hands of Poor Women? Learning from Pakistan’s BISP Program," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 33(3), pages 760-792, June.
    2. Eric V. Edmonds & Caroline B. Theoharides, 2019. "The Short Term Impact of a Productive Asset Transfer in Families with Child Labor: Experimental Evidence from the Philippines," NBER Working Papers 26190, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Kate Ambler & Alan de Brauw & Susan Godlonton, 2018. "Rural Labor Market Responses to Large Lumpy Cash Transfers: Evidence from Malawi," Department of Economics Working Papers 2018-11, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    Cited by:

    1. Eric V. Edmonds & Caroline B. Theoharides, 2019. "The Short Term Impact of a Productive Asset Transfer in Families with Child Labor: Experimental Evidence from the Philippines," NBER Working Papers 26190, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. Ambler, Kate & Doss, Cheryl & Kieran, Caitlin & Passarelli, Simone, 2017. "He says, she says: Exploring patterns of spousal agreement in Bangladesh," IFPRI discussion papers 1616, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Cited by:

    1. Hazel Jean L. Malapit & Esha Sraboni & Agnes R. Quisumbing & Akhter U. Ahmed, 2019. "Intrahousehold empowerment gaps in agriculture and children's well‐being in Bangladesh," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 37(2), pages 176-203, March.
    2. Meinzen-Dick, Ruth & Quisumbing, Agnes & Doss, Cheryl & Theis, Sophie, 2019. "Women's land rights as a pathway to poverty reduction: Framework and review of available evidence," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 72-82.
    3. Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Doss, Cheryl R. & Theis, Sophie, 2017. "Women’s land rights as a pathway to poverty reduction: A framework and review of available evidence," IFPRI discussion papers 1663, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Ngonidzashe Chirinda & Laura Arenas & Sandra Loaiza & Catalina Trujillo & Maria Katto & Paula Chaparro & Jonathan Nuñez & Jacobo Arango & Deissy Martinez-Baron & Ana María Loboguerrero & Luis A. Becer, 2017. "Novel Technological and Management Options for Accelerating Transformational Changes in Rice and Livestock Systems," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 9(11), pages 1-16, October.
    5. Panu Poutvaara & Maximilian Schwefer, 2018. "Husbands’ and wives’ diverging perceptions on who decides," ifo Working Paper Series 279, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    6. Gundula Fischer & Nicolas Patt & Justus Ochieng & Henry Mvungi, 2020. "Participation in and Gains from Traditional Vegetable Value Chains: a Gendered Analysis of Perceptions of Labour, Income and Expenditure in Producers’ and Traders’ Households," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 32(4), pages 1080-1104, September.
    7. Kilic,Talip & Moylan,Heather G. & Koolwal,Gayatri B., 2020. "Getting the (Gender-Disaggregated) Lay of the Land : Impact of Survey Respondent Selection on Measuring Land Ownership and Rights," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9151, The World Bank.

  4. Ambler, Kate & de Brauw, Alan & Godlonton, Susan, 2017. "Measuring postharvest losses at the farm level in Malawi," IFPRI discussion papers 1632, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Cited by:

    1. Kate Ambler & Susan Godlonton & María P. Recalde, 2019. "Follow the leader? A field experiment on social influence," Department of Economics Working Papers 2019-24, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    2. Joachim Vandercasteelen & Luc Christiaensen, 2020. "Breaking Down Silos - On-Post Harvest Loss Interventions in Tanzania," LICOS Discussion Papers 42020, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    3. Delavallade,Clara Anne & Godlonton,Susan, 2020. "Locking Crops to Unlock Investment : Experimental Evidence on Warrantage in Burkina Faso," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9248, The World Bank.
    4. Marshall Burke & Lauren Falcao Bergquist & Edward Miguel, 2018. "Sell Low and Buy High: Arbitrage and Local Price Effects in Kenyan Markets," NBER Working Papers 24476, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Bo Yan & Gaodi Liu & Zhenyu Zhang & Chang Yan, 2020. "Optimal financing and operation strategy of fresh agricultural supply chain," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 64(3), pages 776-794, July.
    6. Abdelrahman Ali & Chunping Xia & Moustafa Ismaiel & N’Banan Ouattara & Irfan Mahmood & Dessalegn Anshiso, 2021. "Analysis of determinants to mitigate food losses and waste in the developing countries: empirical evidence from Egypt," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 26(6), pages 1-26, August.
    7. Mequanint B. Melesse & Marrit Berg & Christophe Béné & Alan Brauw & Inge D. Brouwer, 2020. "Metrics to analyze and improve diets through food Systems in low and Middle Income Countries," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 12(5), pages 1085-1105, October.
    8. Delgado, Luciana & Schuster, Monica & Torero, Maximo, 2021. "Quantity and quality food losses across the value Chain: A Comparative analysis," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 98(C).
    9. Luciana Delgado & Monica Schuster & Maximo Torero, 2021. "On the origins of food loss," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 43(2), pages 750-780, June.

  5. Ambler, Kate & De Brauw,Alan, 2017. "The impacts of cash transfers on women?s empowerment : learning from Pakistan?s BISP program," Policy Research Working Paper Series 113161, The World Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Tehmeena Iqbal & Shujaat Farooq & Ihtsham Ul Haq Padda, 2021. "Can Empowerment be Enhanced by Putting Cash in the Hands of Poor Women? Learning from Pakistan’s BISP Program," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 33(3), pages 760-792, June.
    2. Yashodhan Ghorpade & Patricia Justino, 2019. "Winning or buying hearts and minds?: Cash transfers and political attitudes in Pakistan," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-91, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Alan de Brauw & Amber Peterman, 2020. "Can conditional cash transfers improve maternal health care? Evidence from El Salvador's Comunidades Solidarias Rurales program," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(6), pages 700-715, June.
    4. Nawaz, Saima & Iqbal, Nasir, 2021. "How cash transfers program affects environmental poverty among ultra-poor? Insights from the BISP in Pakistan," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 148(PB).
    5. Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa & Iqbal, Nasir & Nawaz, Saima & Yew, Siew Ling, 2021. "Unconditional cash transfers, child labour and education: theory and evidence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 186(C), pages 437-457.
    6. Barr, Nicholas, 2019. "Gender and family: conceptual overview," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 101237, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Muhammad Tariq & Aneesa & Farah Khan, 2019. "The Effects of Social Protection Program on Food Consumption and Poverty in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan," Business & Economic Review, Institute of Management Sciences, Peshawar, Pakistan, vol. 11(1), pages 55-82, March.
    8. Nawaz, Saima & Iqbal, Nasir, 2020. "The impact of unconditional cash transfer on fuel choices among ultra-poor in Pakistan: Quasi-experimental evidence from the Benazir Income Support Program," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 142(C).

  6. Ambler, Kate & de Brauw, Alan & Godlonton, Susan, 2017. "Cash transfers and management advice for agriculture: Evidence from Senegal:," IFPRI discussion papers 1659, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Cited by:

    1. Delavallade,Clara Anne & Godlonton,Susan, 2020. "Locking Crops to Unlock Investment : Experimental Evidence on Warrantage in Burkina Faso," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9248, The World Bank.
    2. Kate Ambler & Alan de Brauw & Susan Godlonton, 2018. "Rural Labor Market Responses to Large Lumpy Cash Transfers: Evidence from Malawi," Department of Economics Working Papers 2018-11, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    3. G.T. Abate & Tanguy Bernard & A. de Brauw & N. Minot, 2018. "The impact of the use of new technologies on farmers’ wheat yield in Ethiopia: evidence from a randomized control trial," Post-Print hal-03033647, HAL.
    4. Eric V. Edmonds & Caroline B. Theoharides, 2019. "The Short Term Impact of a Productive Asset Transfer in Families with Child Labor: Experimental Evidence from the Philippines," NBER Working Papers 26190, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  7. Kate Ambler & Diego Aycinena & Dean Yang, 2014. "Channeling Remittances to Education: A Field Experiment Among Migrants from El Salvador," NBER Working Papers 20262, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Fadi Hassan & Paolo Lucchino, 2016. "Powering Education," CEP Discussion Papers dp1438, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    2. McKenzie, David & Yang, Dean, 2014. "Evidence on policies to increase the development impacts of international migration," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7057, The World Bank.
    3. Catia Batista & Gaia Narciso, 2014. "Migrant Remittances and Information Flows: Evidence from a Field Experiment," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2014001, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
    4. Magnan, Nicholas & Hoffmann, Vivian & Opoku, Nelson & Gajate Garrido, Gissele & Kanyam, Daniel Akwasi, 2021. "Information, technology, and market rewards: Incentivizing aflatoxin control in Ghana," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 151(C).
    5. Cl'ement de Chaisemartin & Jaime Ramirez-Cuellar, 2019. "At What Level Should One Cluster Standard Errors in Paired and Small-Strata Experiments?," Papers 1906.00288, arXiv.org, revised May 2021.
    6. Ambler, Kate, 2015. "Don't tell on me: Experimental evidence of asymmetric information in transnational households," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 52-69.
    7. Parag Mahajan & Dean Yang, 2017. "Taken by Storm: Hurricanes, Migrant Networks, and U.S. Immigration," Working Papers 17-50, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    8. Asatryan, Zareh & Bittschi, Benjamin & Doerrenberg, Philipp, 2017. "Remittances and public finances: Evidence from oil-price shocks," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 155(C), pages 122-137.
    9. Gonzalo Cómbita Mora & Óscar Pérez Rodríguez, 2020. "International Remittances and Child Welfare: A Case Study on Cali Colombia," Revista Desarrollo y Sociedad, Universidad de los Andes - CEDE, vol. 86(3), pages 73-103, November.
    10. De Arcangelis, Giuseppe & Joxhe, Majlinda & McKenzie, David & Tiongson, Erwin & Yang, Dean, 2014. "Directing remittances to education with soft and hard commitments : evidence from a lab-in-the-field experiment and new product take-up among Filipino migrants in Rome," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6896, The World Bank.
    11. Licuanan, Victoria & Omar Mahmoud, Toman & Steinmayr, Andreas, 2012. "The drivers of diaspora donations for development: Evidence from the Philippines," Kiel Working Papers 1807, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    12. Björn NILSSON, 2019. "Education and migration: insights for policymakers," Working Paper 23ca9c54-061a-4d60-967c-f, Agence française de développement.
    13. Belot, Michele & James, Jonathan, 2013. "Partner Selection into Policy Relevant Field Experiments," SIRE Discussion Papers 2013-112, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    14. Keerti Mallela & Sunny Kumar Singh & Archana Srivastava, 2020. "Estimating Bilateral Remittances in a Macroeconomic Framework: Evidence from top Remittance-Receiving Countries," Studies in Microeconomics, , vol. 8(1), pages 95-118, June.
    15. Clemens, Michael A., 2021. "Violence, development, and migration waves: Evidence from Central American child migrant apprehensions," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C).
    16. Ambler, Kate, 2013. "Don’t tell on me: Experimental evidence of asymmetric information in transnational households:," IFPRI discussion papers 1312, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    17. Adelman,Melissa Ann & Szekely,Miguel, 2016. "School dropout in Central America : an overview of trends, causes, consequences, and promising interventions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7561, The World Bank.
    18. Ma, Yechi & Chen, Zhiguo & Shinwari, Riazullah & Khan, Zeeshan, 2021. "Financialization, globalization, and Dutch disease: Is Dutch disease exist for resources rich countries?," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 72(C).
    19. Yu Bai & Linxiu Zhang & Chengfang Liu & Yaojiang Shi & Di Mo & Scott Rozelle, 2018. "Effect of Parental Migration on the Academic Performance of Left Behind Children in North Western China," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 54(7), pages 1154-1170, July.
    20. Kate Ambler & Diego Aycinena & Dean Yang, 2014. "Remittance Responses to Temporary Discounts: A Field Experiment among Central American Migrants," NBER Working Papers 20522, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Giuseppe Arcangelis & Majlinda Joxhe, 2021. "Intra-household allocation with shared expenditure choices: experimental evidence from Filipino migrants," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 19(4), pages 1245-1274, December.
    22. Kate Ambler & Susan Godlonton, 2020. "Information Asymmetries and Remittance Recipient Income: A Field Experiment in Malawi," Department of Economics Working Papers 2020-12, Department of Economics, Williams College.

  8. Kate Ambler & Diego Aycinena & Dean Yang, 2014. "Remittance Responses to Temporary Discounts: A Field Experiment among Central American Migrants," NBER Working Papers 20522, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. McKenzie, David & Yang, Dean, 2014. "Evidence on policies to increase the development impacts of international migration," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7057, The World Bank.
    2. Giulia Bettin & Riccardo Lucchetti, 2016. "Steady streams and sudden bursts: persistence patterns in remittance decisions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 263-292, January.
    3. Melissa Siegel, 2017. "Commentaires sur « Des politiques migratoires pour promouvoir le développement »," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 25(1), pages 97-103.

  9. Ambler, Kate, 2013. "Don’t tell on me: Experimental evidence of asymmetric information in transnational households:," IFPRI discussion papers 1312, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    Cited by:

    1. McKenzie, David & Yang, Dean, 2014. "Evidence on policies to increase the development impacts of international migration," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7057, The World Bank.
    2. Torero, Máximo & Viceisza, Angelino, 2015. "To remit, or not to remit: that is the question. A remittance field experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 221-236.
    3. Catia Batista & Gaia Narciso, 2014. "Migrant Remittances and Information Flows: Evidence from a Field Experiment," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2014001, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
    4. Bertoli, Simone & Murard, Elie, 2017. "Migration and Co-Residence Choices: Evidence from Mexico," IZA Discussion Papers 11172, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Joachim De Weerdt & Garance Genicot & Alice Mesnard, 2014. "Asymmetry of information within family networks," Working Papers of LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance 503751, KU Leuven, Faculty of Economics and Business (FEB), LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance.
    6. De Weerdt, Joachim & Hirvonen, Kalle, 2013. "Risk sharing and internal migration," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6429, The World Bank.
    7. Thomas Joseph & Yaw Nyarko & Shing-Yi Wang, 2018. "Asymmetric Information and Remittances: Evidence from Matched Administrative Data," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 58-100, April.
    8. Toman Barsbai & Victoria Licuanan & Andreas Steinmayr & Erwin Tiongson & Dean Yang, 2020. "Information and the Acquisition of Social Network Connections," NBER Working Papers 27346, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Maria Porter & Abigail Adams, 2014. "For Love or Reward? Characterising Preferences for Giving to Parents in an Experimental Setting," Economics Series Working Papers 709, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    10. Bertoli, Simone & Gautrain, Elsa & Murard, Elie, 2020. "Left Behind, but Not Alone: Changes in Living Arrangements and the Effects of Migration and Remittances in Mexico," IZA Discussion Papers 13917, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Batista, Catia & Silverman, Dan & Yang, Dean, 2013. "Directed Giving: Evidence from an Inter-Household Transfer Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 7629, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Doi, Yoko & McKenzie, David & Zia, Bilal, 2014. "Who you train matters: Identifying combined effects of financial education on migrant households," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 39-55.
    13. Genicot, Garance, 2016. "Two-sided altruism and signaling," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 92-97.
    14. De Arcangelis, Giuseppe & Joxhe, Majlinda & McKenzie, David & Tiongson, Erwin & Yang, Dean, 2014. "Directing remittances to education with soft and hard commitments : evidence from a lab-in-the-field experiment and new product take-up among Filipino migrants in Rome," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6896, The World Bank.
    15. Kate Ambler & Diego Aycinena & Dean Yang, 2015. "Channeling Remittances to Education: A Field Experiment among Migrants from El Salvador," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 207-232, April.

Articles

  1. Kate Ambler, 2016. "Bargaining with Grandma: The Impact of the South African Pension on Household Decision-Making," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 51(4), pages 900-932.

    Cited by:

    1. Kacker, Kanishka, 2019. "Social transfers and labor supply: Long run rvidence from South Africa," MPRA Paper 99044, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Cheng, Lingguo & Liu, Hong & Zhang, Ye & Zhao, Zhong, 2016. "The Health Implications of Social Pensions: Evidence from China's New Rural Pension Scheme," IZA Discussion Papers 9621, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Alzua, Maria Laura & Cantet, Maria Natalia & Dammert, Ana & Olajide, Daminola, 2020. "Mental Health Effects of an Old Age Pension: Experimental Evidence for Ekiti State in Nigeria," 2020 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, Kansas City, Missouri 304176, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Abel, Martin, 2013. "Unintended labour supply effects of cash transfer programmes: Evidence from South Africa's old age pension," SALDRU Working Papers 114, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    5. Alessandro Tondini & Cally Ardington & Ingrid Woolard, 2017. "Public pensions and elderly informal employment: Evidence from a change in retirement age in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 206, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    6. Cally Ardington & Boingotlo Gasealahwe, 2012. "Health: Analysis of the NIDS Wave 1 and 2 Datasets," SALDRU Working Papers 80, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    7. Roxana Manea & Patrizio Piraino & Martina Viarengo, 2021. "Crime, Inequality and Subsidized Housing: Evidence from South Africa," CESifo Working Paper Series 8914, CESifo.
    8. Jean-Paul Azam & Elodie Djemaï, 2019. "Matching, Cooperation and HIV in the Couple," Working Papers hal-02013529, HAL.
    9. Independent Evaluation Group, 2014. "Social Safety Nets and Gender : Learning from Impact Evaluations and World Bank Projects," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 21365.
    10. Chloé van Biljon, 2017. "The effect of old age pensions on child deprivation: revisiting the role of gender," Working Papers 13/2017, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    11. Baird,Sarah Jane & Mckenzie,David J. & Ozler,Berk, 2018. "The effects of cash transfers on adult labor market outcomes," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8404, The World Bank.
    12. van den Bold, Mara & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Gillespie, Stuart, 2013. "Women’s empowerment and nutrition: An evidence review:," IFPRI discussion papers 1294, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    13. Kate Ambler & Alan de Brauw & Susan Godlonton, 2019. "Lump-sum Transfers for Agriculture and Household Decision Making," Department of Economics Working Papers 2019-19, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    14. Peterman, Amber & Schwab, Benjamin & Roy, Shalini & Hidrobo, Melissa & Gilligan, Daniel O., 2021. "Measuring women’s decisionmaking: Indicator choice and survey design experiments from cash and food transfer evaluations in Ecuador, Uganda and Yemen," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 141(C).

  2. Kate Ambler & Diego Aycinena & Dean Yang, 2015. "Channeling Remittances to Education: A Field Experiment among Migrants from El Salvador," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 207-232, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Ambler, Kate, 2015. "Don't tell on me: Experimental evidence of asymmetric information in transnational households," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 52-69.

    Cited by:

    1. Doepke, Matthias & Tertilt, Michèle, 2016. "Families in Macroeconomics," IZA Discussion Papers 9802, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Catia Batista & Gaia Narciso, 2014. "Migrant Remittances and Information Flows: Evidence from a Field Experiment," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2014001, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
    3. Maria Porter & Abi Adams, 2016. "For Love or Reward? Characterising Preferences for Giving to Parents in an Experimental Setting," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 126(598), pages 2424-2445, December.
    4. Ethan Ligon & Laura Schechter, 2020. "Structural Experimentation to Distinguish between Models of Risk Sharing with Frictions in Rural Paraguay," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 69(1), pages 1-50.
    5. Bertoli, Simone & Murard, Elie, 2017. "Migration and Co-Residence Choices: Evidence from Mexico," IZA Discussion Papers 11172, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Jean-Marie Baland & Roberta Ziparo, 2017. "Intra-household bargaining in poor countries," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2017-108, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Gibson, John & McKenzie, David & Rohorua, Halahingano & Stillman, Steven, 2016. "The Long-Term Impact of International Migration on Economic Decision-Making: Evidence from a Migration Lottery and Lab-in-the-Field Experiments," IZA Discussion Papers 10110, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. De Weerdt, Joachim & Hirvonen, Kalle, 2013. "Risk sharing and internal migration," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6429, The World Bank.
    9. Gibson, John & McKenzie, David & Rohorua, Halahingano & Stillman, Steven, 2020. "Reprint of: The long-term impact of international migration on economic decision-making: Evidence from a migration lottery and lab-in-the-field experiments," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 142(C).
    10. Murard, Elie, 2016. "Consumption and Leisure: The Welfare Impact of Migration on Family Left Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 10305, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Farah Said, 2016. "Access to Finance and Agency: An Overview of the Constraints to Female-Run Enterprises," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 21(Special E), pages 331-349, September.
    12. Bertoli, Simone & Gautrain, Elsa & Murard, Elie, 2020. "Left Behind, but Not Alone: Changes in Living Arrangements and the Effects of Migration and Remittances in Mexico," IZA Discussion Papers 13917, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    13. Batista, Catia & Silverman, Dan & Yang, Dean, 2013. "Directed Giving: Evidence from an Inter-Household Transfer Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 7629, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Abbink, Klaus & Islam, Asad & Nguyen, Chau, 2020. "Whose voice matters? An experimental examination of gender bias in intra-household decision-making," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 337-352.
    15. Strupat, Christoph & Klohn, Florian, 2018. "Crowding out of solidarity? Public health insurance versus informal transfer networks in Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 212-221.
    16. Genicot, Garance, 2016. "Two-sided altruism and signaling," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 92-97.
    17. Kate Ambler & Susan Godlonton, 2019. "Windfalls and work requirements: Evidence from a field experiment in Malawi," Department of Economics Working Papers 2019-25, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    18. De Arcangelis, Giuseppe & Joxhe, Majlinda & McKenzie, David & Tiongson, Erwin & Yang, Dean, 2014. "Directing remittances to education with soft and hard commitments : evidence from a lab-in-the-field experiment and new product take-up among Filipino migrants in Rome," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6896, The World Bank.
    19. Björn NILSSON, 2019. "Education and migration: insights for policymakers," Working Paper 23ca9c54-061a-4d60-967c-f, Agence française de développement.
    20. Carolina Alban Conto, 2021. "Does Distance-Driven Information Asymmetry Affect Private Income Transfers? Theory and Evidence From Colombia," Working Papers hal-03192955, HAL.
    21. Cuadros-Meñaca, Andres, 2020. "Remittances, health insurance, and pension contributions: Evidence from Colombia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 127(C).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 10 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEV: Development (6) 2014-07-05 2014-12-19 2017-05-14 2017-08-27 2019-01-07 2019-10-28. Author is listed
  2. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (6) 2014-07-05 2014-12-19 2017-08-27 2019-12-02 2020-01-06 2021-01-11. Author is listed
  3. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (3) 2017-05-14 2017-08-27 2019-12-02. Author is listed
  4. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (2) 2014-07-05 2014-12-19
  5. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2014-07-05
  6. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2014-07-05
  7. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (1) 2017-05-14
  8. NEP-GEN: Gender (1) 2017-04-16
  9. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (1) 2017-04-16
  10. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2019-12-02
  11. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2019-12-02

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Kate Ambler should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.