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Don’t tell on me: Experimental evidence of asymmetric information in transnational households:

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  • Ambler, Kate

Abstract

Although most theoretical models of household decisionmaking assume perfect information, empirical studies suggest that information asymmetries can have large impacts on resource allocation. In this study, I demonstrate the importance of these asymmetries in transnational households, where physical distance between family members can make information barriers especially acute.

Suggested Citation

  • Ambler, Kate, 2013. "Don’t tell on me: Experimental evidence of asymmetric information in transnational households:," IFPRI discussion papers 1312, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1312
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    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp01312.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David McKenzie & Dean Yang, 2015. "Evidence on Policies to Increase the Development Impacts of International Migration," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 30(2), pages 155-192.
    2. Torero, Máximo & Viceisza, Angelino, 2015. "To remit, or not to remit: that is the question. A remittance field experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 221-236.
    3. Catia Batista & Gaia Narciso, 2013. "Migrant remittances and information flows: Evidence from a field experiment," NOVAFRICA Working Paper Series wp1306, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia, NOVAFRICA.
    4. Bertoli, Simone & Murard, Elie, 2017. "Migration and Co-Residence Choices: Evidence from Mexico," IZA Discussion Papers 11172, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Joachim De Weerdt & Kalle Hirvonen, 2016. "Risk Sharing and Internal Migration," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65(1), pages 63-86.
    6. repec:aea:aejapp:v:10:y:2018:i:2:p:58-100 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. De Weerdt, Joachim & Genicot, Garance & Mesnard, Alice, 2014. "Asymmetry of Information within Family Networks," IZA Discussion Papers 8395, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Maria Porter, 2014. "For Love or Reward? Characterising Preferences for Giving to Parents in an Experimental Setting," Economics Series Working Papers 709, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    9. Batista, Catia & Silverman, Dan & Yang, Dean, 2015. "Directed giving: Evidence from an inter-household transfer experiment," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 2-21.
    10. Doi, Yoko & McKenzie, David & Zia, Bilal, 2014. "Who you train matters: Identifying combined effects of financial education on migrant households," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 39-55.
    11. Genicot, Garance, 2016. "Two-sided altruism and signaling," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 92-97.
    12. De Arcangelis, Giuseppe & Joxhe, Majlinda & McKenzie, David & Tiongson, Erwin & Yang, Dean, 2015. "Directing remittances to education with soft and hard commitments: Evidence from a lab-in-the-field experiment and new product take-up among Filipino migrants in Rome," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 197-208.
    13. Kate Ambler & Diego Aycinena & Dean Yang, 2015. "Channeling Remittances to Education: A Field Experiment among Migrants from El Salvador," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(2), pages 207-232, April.
    14. Thomas Joseph & Yaw Nyarko & Shing-Yi Wang, 2018. "Asymmetric Information and Remittances: Evidence from Matched Administrative Data," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 58-100, April.
    15. Jean-Marie Baland & Roberta Ziparo, 2017. "Intra-household bargaining in poor countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 108, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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    Keywords

    households; Resource allocation;

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