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Analytical Framework for Evaluating the Productive Impact of Cash Transfer Programmes on Household Behaviour ? Methodological Guidelines for the From Protection to Production Project

Author

Listed:
  • Solomon Asfaw

    () (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO))

  • Silvio Daidone

    () (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO))

  • Benjamin Davis

    () (FAO)

  • Josh Dewbre

    () (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO))

  • Alessandro Romeo

    () (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO))

  • Paul Winters

    () (American University)

  • Katia Covarrubias

    () (FAO)

  • Habiba Djebbari

    () (Universite Laval)

Abstract

Cash transfer programmes have become an important tool of social protection and poverty reduction strategies in low- and middle-income countries. In the past decade, a growing number of African governments have launched cash transfer programmes as part of their strategies of social protection. Most of these programmes have been accompanied by rigorous impact evaluations. Concern about vulnerable populations in the context of HIV/AIDS has driven the objectives and targeting of many of these programmes, leading to an emphasis on those people who are ultra-poor, labour-constrained, with prevalence of adverse health conditions, elderly and/or caring for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) (Davis et al., 2012). As a result, the objectives of most of these programmes focus on food security, health, nutritional and educational status, particularly of children, and so, as would be expected, the accompanying impact evaluations concentrate on measuring these dimensions of programme impact. (?)

Suggested Citation

  • Solomon Asfaw & Silvio Daidone & Benjamin Davis & Josh Dewbre & Alessandro Romeo & Paul Winters & Katia Covarrubias & Habiba Djebbari, 2012. "Analytical Framework for Evaluating the Productive Impact of Cash Transfer Programmes on Household Behaviour ? Methodological Guidelines for the From Protection to Production Project," Working Papers 101, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  • Handle: RePEc:ipc:wpaper:101
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    File URL: http://www.ipc-undp.org/pub/IPCWorkingPaper101.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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