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Seeing is believing ? evidence from an extension network experiment

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  • Kondylis,Florence
  • Mueller, Valerie
  • Zhu, Siyao Jessica

Abstract

Extension is designed to enable lab-to-farm technology diffusion. Decentralized models assume that information flows from researchers to extension workers, and from extension agents to contact farmers (CFs). CFs should then train other farmers in their communities. Such a modality may fail to address informational inefficiencies and accountability issues. The authors run a field experiment to measure the impact of augmenting the CF model with a direct CF training on the diffusion of a new technology. All villages have CFs and access the same extension network. In treatment villages, CFs additionally receive a three-day, central training on the new technology. They track information transmission through two nodes of the extension network: from extension agents to CFs, and from CFs to other farmers. Directly training CFs leads to a large, statistically significant increase in adoption among CFs. However, higher levels of CF adoption have limited impact on the behavior of other farmers.

Suggested Citation

  • Kondylis,Florence & Mueller, Valerie & Zhu, Siyao Jessica, 2014. "Seeing is believing ? evidence from an extension network experiment," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7000, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7000
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    Cited by:

    1. Yao Pan & Stephen C. Smith & Munshi Sulaiman, 2015. "Agricultural Extension and Technology Adoption for Food Security: Evidence from Uganda," Working Papers 2015-11, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    2. Florence Kondylis & Valerie Mueller & S. Zhu, 2015. "Measuring agricultural knowledge and adoption," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 46(3), pages 449-462, May.
    3. repec:eee:agisys:v:165:y:2018:i:c:p:147-163 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:wdevel:v:103:y:2018:i:c:p:216-225 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Sibusiso NHLENGETHWA & Greenwell MATCHAYA & Pius CHILONDA, 2014. "The Agriculture Sector Performance In Mozambique," Revista Galega de Economía, University of Santiago de Compostela. Faculty of Economics and Business., vol. 23(4), pages 105-122.
    6. Benyishay,Ariel & Jones,Maria Ruth & Kondylis,Florence & Mobarak,Ahmed Mushfiq, 2016. "Are gender differences in performance innate or socially mediated ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7689, The World Bank.
    7. Magnan, Nicholas & Spielman, David J. & Gulati, Kajal & Lybbert, Travis, 2015. "Information Networks among Women and Men and the Demand for an Agricultural Technology in India," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212209, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. de Janvry, Alain & Emerick, Kyle & Kelley, Erin & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 2019. "Endogenous Information Sharing and the Gains from Using Network Information to Maximize Technology Adoption," CEPR Discussion Papers 13507, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Morgan, Stephen N. & Mason, Nicole M. & Maredia, Mywish K., 2018. "Farmer Valuation of Improved Bean Seed Technologies: Real Auction Evidence from Tanzania," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274242, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    10. Benson, Todd & Mogues, Tewodaj & Woldeyohannes, Sileshi, 2014. "Assessing progress made toward shared agricultural transformation objectives in Mozambique:," IFPRI discussion papers 1370, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. Ambler, Kate & de Brauw, Alan & Godlonton, Susan, 2017. "Cash transfers and management advice for agriculture: Evidence from Senegal:," IFPRI discussion papers 1659, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Leuveld, Koen & Nillesen, Eleonora & Pieters, Janneke & Ross, Martha & Voors, Maarten & Wang Sonne, Elise, 2018. "Agricultural extension and input subsidies to reduce food insecurity. Evidence from a field experiment in the Congo," MERIT Working Papers 009, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    13. Kazushi Takahashi & Yukichi Mano & Keijiro Otsuka, 2018. "Spillovers as a Driver to Reduce Ex-post Inequality Generated by Randomized Experiments: Evidence from an Agricultural Training Intervention," Working Papers 174, JICA Research Institute.
    14. Elisabeth SADOULET, 2016. "Review of Theories of Learning for Adopting," Working Papers P163, FERDI.
    15. repec:eee:wdevel:v:115:y:2019:i:c:p:94-106 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. repec:eee:wdevel:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:1-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Mueller, Valerie & Billings, Lucy & Mogues, Tewodaj & Peterman, Amber & Wineman, Ayala, 2015. "Filling the legal void? Experimental evidence from a community-based legal aid program for gender-equal land rights in Tanzania:," IFPRI discussion papers 1434, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    18. Niu, Chiyu & Ragasa, Catherine, 2018. "Selective attention and information loss in the lab-to-farm knowledge chain: The case of Malawian agricultural extension programs," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 147-163.
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    20. Nielsen, Thea & Schunemann, Franziska & McNulty, Emily & Zeller, Manfred & Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Kato, Edward & Meyer, Stefan & Anderson, Weston & Zhu, Tingju & Queface, Antonio & Mapemba, Lawrence, 2015. "The food-energy-water security nexus: Definitions, policies, and methods in an application to Malawi and Mozambique:," IFPRI discussion papers 1480, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    21. Shikuku, K.M., 2018. "Information exchange links, knowledge exposure, and adoption of agricultural technologies in Northern Uganda," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 275974, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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    Keywords

    Adaptation to Climate Change; Climate Change and Agriculture;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • Q1 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture
    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty

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