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Impact of Farmer Field Schools on Agricultural Productivity and Poverty in East Africa

  • Davis, K.
  • Nkonya, E.
  • Kato, E.
  • Mekonnen, D.A.
  • Odendo, M.
  • Miiro, R.
  • Nkuba, J.

The authors used a longitudinal impact evaluation with quasi-experimental methods to provide evidence on economic and production impact of a farmer field school (FFS) project in East Africa. FFSs were shown to have positive impact on production and income among women, low-literacy, and medium land size farmers. Participation in FFS increased income by 61%. Participation in FFS improved agricultural income and crop productivity overall. This implies that farmer field schools are a useful approach to increase production and income of small-scale farmers in East Africa, and that the approach can be used to target women and producers with limited literacy.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 40 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 402-413

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:40:y:2012:i:2:p:402-413
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