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The Impact of Farmer Field Schools on Knowledge and Productivity: A Study of Potato Farmers in the Peruvian Andes

  • Godtland, Erin M
  • Sadoulet, Elisabeth
  • De Janvry, Alain
  • Murgai, Rinku
  • Ortiz, Oscar

Using survey data from Peru, this article evaluates the impact of a pilot farmer-field-school (FFS) program on farmers' knowledge of integrated pest management (IPM) practices related to potato cultivation. We use both regression analysis controlling for participation and a propensity score matching approach to create a comparison group similar to the FFS participants in observable characteristics. Results are robust across the two approaches as well as with different matching methods. We find that farmers who participate in the program have significantly more knowledge about IPM practices than those in the nonparticipant comparison group. We also find suggestive evidence that improved knowledge about IPM practices has the potential to significantly improve productivity in potato production.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/423253
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Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Volume (Year): 53 (2004)
Issue (Month): 1 (October)
Pages: 63-92

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:y:2004:v:53:i:1:p:63-92
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/EDCC/

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  1. Heckman, James J. & Robb, Richard Jr., 1985. "Alternative methods for evaluating the impact of interventions : An overview," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 239-267.
  2. Picciotto, Robert & Anderson, Jock R, 1997. "Reconsidering Agricultural Extension," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 12(2), pages 249-59, August.
  3. Revenga, Ana & Riboud, Michelle & Tan, Hong, 1994. "The Impact of Mexico's Retraining Program on Employment and Wages," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 8(2), pages 247-77, May.
  4. Anderson, Jock R. & Feder, Gershon, 2007. "Agricultural Extension," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, Elsevier.
  5. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1995. "Learning by Doing and Learning from Others: Human Capital and Technical Change in Agriculture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1176-1209, December.
  6. Gershon Feder & Rinku Murgai & Jaime B. Quizon, 2004. "Sending Farmers Back to School: The Impact of Farmer Field Schools in Indonesia," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 26(1), pages 45-62.
  7. Jyotsna Jalan & Martin Ravallion, 2000. "Estimating the Benefit Incidence of an Antipoverty Program by Propensity Score Matching," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0873, Econometric Society.
  8. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra Todd, 1998. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 261-294.
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