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Junior Farmer Field Schools, Agricultural Knowledge and Spillover Effects: Quasi-experimental Evidence from Northern Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Jacopo Bonan

    (Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM))

  • Laura Pagani

    (University of Milano-Bicocca)

Abstract

We analyse the impact of a junior farmer field school project in Northern Uganda on students’ agricultural knowledge and practices. We also test for the presence of intergenerational learning spillover within households. We use differences-in-differences estimators with ex-ante matching. We find that the program had positive effects on students’ agricultural knowledge and adoption of good practices and that it produced some spillover effects in terms of improvements of household agricultural knowledge and food security. Overall, our results point to the importance of adapting the basic principles of farmer field schools to children.

Suggested Citation

  • Jacopo Bonan & Laura Pagani, 2016. "Junior Farmer Field Schools, Agricultural Knowledge and Spillover Effects: Quasi-experimental Evidence from Northern Uganda," Working Papers 2016.72, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  • Handle: RePEc:fem:femwpa:2016.72
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Junior Farmer Field Schools; Agricultural Extension; Intergenerational Learning Spillover; Uganda;

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O22 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Project Analysis
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments

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