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An Impact Analysis of Farmer Field Schools on Hog Productivity: Evidence from China

Author

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  • Jinyang Cai

    (School of Management and Economics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, China
    Yangtze Delta Region Academy of Beijing Institute of Technology, Jiaxing 314011, China)

  • Fengxiang Ding

    (School of Management and Economics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, China)

  • Yu Hong

    (School of Management and Economics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, China)

  • Ruifa Hu

    (School of Management and Economics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081, China
    Yangtze Delta Region Academy of Beijing Institute of Technology, Jiaxing 314011, China)

Abstract

In recent decades, pigs and pork have been the central elements of Chinese agricultural systems, food security, and diet. China’s rapid income growth has induced a significant change in food consumption patterns, and hog production has received utmost attention from both, the Chinese government and the public. While the impact of Farmer Field Schools (FFS) on crop cultivation has been widely studied, few studies have examined the impact of FFS on hog production. This study uses data collected from 222 hog farmers in Beijing to examine the impact of FFS on the productivity of hog production, focusing on its three main indicators: feed conversion ratio and the mortality of sows and piglets. We found that farms that participated in FFS programs significantly improved the feed conversion ratio of hog production, particularly in small scale hog farms. On average, FFS reduced the feed conversion ratio for herd sizes of 1000, 500, and 200 by 6.8%, 10.7%, and 14.0%, respectively. We did not find evidence that farms that participated in FFS programs had a significant impact on minimizing the mortality of sows and piglets. This study suggests that the knowledge training model of the FFS program could also work in fields other than crop cultivation. Furthermore, we suggest that more attention could be paid to extension services diffusing knowledge of vaccination and disinfection in hog FFS programs.

Suggested Citation

  • Jinyang Cai & Fengxiang Ding & Yu Hong & Ruifa Hu, 2021. "An Impact Analysis of Farmer Field Schools on Hog Productivity: Evidence from China," Agriculture, MDPI, vol. 11(10), pages 1-14, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jagris:v:11:y:2021:i:10:p:972-:d:651108
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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